Tag Archiv: 苏州上门足浴全

Bon Iver Debuts New Album At Eaux Claires Festival, Feat. Bruce Hornsby [Full Set Video]

first_imgBon Iver announced his third full-length LP, 22, A Million, on Friday, after five years of studio silence. On the evening of said special announcement, Justin Vernon led the band to perform the entire album, in full, at his own festival Eaux Claires Music Festival in Wisconsin. A surprising move, to say the least, for any band — to perform an album live on the same day of its announcement — made for an incredibly special evening for festival attendees.Ready to hit stores on September 30th via Jagjaguwar Records, you can listen to the full set now, which includes the entire new album, with songs like “21 M♢♢N WATER”, “22 (OVER S88N)”, and “33 “GOD”, along with an encore that includes some new takes on past Bon Iver favorites “Minnesota, WI” and a very special “Beth/Rest” featuring Bruce Hornsby.Enjoy these live versions of the upcoming 22, A Million, by Bon Iver, courtesy of YouTube user cookiecrumblemusic. While the video says less about the album, it’s the audio worth paying attention to:Bon Iver @ Eaux Claires Music Festival 8/12/16:22 (OVER S88N)10 d E A T h b R E a s T715 – CREEKS33 “GOD”29 #Strafford APTS666 ʇ21 M♢♢N WATER8 (circle)____45_____00000 MillionEncore:Beach Baby (with The Staves)Minnesota, WI (New arrangement)Creature FearBeth/Rest (with Bruce Hornsby) (New arrangement)[via CoS]last_img read more

Harvard to guarantee workers’ pay, benefits amid coronavirus disruptions

first_imgHarvard also announced today that it is providing financial stabilization for the six independent nonprofit child-care centers on the University’s campuses. The support package will enable the centers to ensure employment, pay, and benefits for about 180 employees through June 30, even if closures related to COVID-19 remain in effect. Under normal conditions, these centers serve 380 families in the Boston, Cambridge, and Harvard communities.The new updates to Harvard’s human resources policies build on previous enhancements that continued pay for 30 days for employees who no longer had work available after the majority of the University’s student population left campus and allowed workers to use up to 14 days of unearned sick leave in advance.“As the situation regarding COVID-19 has evolved, the human resources community at Harvard has continued its commitment to updating our policies to best support the University’s workers,” said Vice President for Human Resources Marilyn Hausammann. “These enhancements to the pay continuation policy and to the extension of coverage to employees of our key vendors illustrate how important it is to adapt during these challenging times, and more importantly, they show the deep appreciation the University has for its staff members and the contributions they make to Harvard every day.” Managing the coronavirus exodus from campus Jeffrey Frankel cites domino effect of problems in China, huge U.S. deficit, likely decline in jobs and spending Amid the upheavals to campus life brought by the coronavirus pandemic, Harvard announced today it would guarantee pay and benefits through May 28 to its employees and contract workers who have experienced job disruptions since March 10, when the University announced the move to virtual classes.“For our workforce, who each day are so critical to the success of this institution, this unprecedented public health emergency has created innumerable challenges,” wrote Executive Vice President Katie Lapp in an email to University leaders announcing the changes to human resources policies. “The steps I share today are aimed at providing greater certainty for them in these uncertain times with regards to their pay and benefits, and greater stability for them and their families.”The extension of regular pay and benefits to Harvard employees, including administrative, professional, support staff, and service and trade workers, covers those who are well and available to work, but whose duties cannot be performed remotely, including dining and custodial services. Harvard will also expand eligibility for this guarantee to part-time contingent employees who work less than half time.“This is a positive announcement for HUCTW members that we’re very pleased to see,” said Carrie Barbash, president of the Harvard Union of Clerical and Technical Workers. “We’ve been in serious ongoing conversations with University administrators about how the virus affects our members, and they have been responsive and positive. At such an incredibly challenging and unprecedented time for so many people in the U.S. and in our community, it’s heartening to see this good citizenship from the University — Harvard taking care of its committed and hard-working staff, both union and nonunion.”Contract employees from Harvard’s 14 major service suppliers working in security, dining, and custodial roles will also be eligible for extended pay and benefits. Harvard is working directly with these supplier companies to ensure continued support for those who are well and available for work, but displaced from their contract assignments by the coronavirus pandemic and therefore unable to obtain new assignments. “We applaud Harvard for doing the right thing and implementing a leave policy that will allow both contracted and directly employed workers to make ends meet during this unprecedented crisis.” — Roxana Rivera, 32BJ Service Employees International Union “UNITE HERE Local 26 commends Harvard for making the right decision for its dining hall workers and the public at large,” said the union’s president, Carlos Aramayo. “Nothing can reopen until we tackle this public health crisis head-on. Compensating workers, whether they are direct employees or subcontracted employees, who are staying at home to help solve this crisis helps ensure no one has to face unnecessary financial burdens during this already difficult time.”“We applaud Harvard for doing the right thing and implementing a leave policy that will allow both contracted and directly employed workers to make ends meet during this unprecedented crisis,” added Roxana Rivera, vice president of 32BJ Service Employees International Union. “Having access to pay and health care benefits will give the 1,000 cleaners and security officers 32BJ represents at Harvard peace of mind knowing they can stay safe and healthy while continuing to feed their families. These workers have been at the frontlines of fighting this virus, keeping the campus clean and safe for the entire Harvard community even as students go back home, and we’re glad that Harvard is acknowledging their important service.” Coronavirus likely to infect the global economy Harvard’s Lipsitch urges public to ramp up social distancing, increase coronavirus tests ‘Worry about 4 weeks from now,’ epidemiologist warns Why odds of a coronavirus recession have risen Related Campus Services VP Meredith Weenick on Harvard’s work to prevent the spread of disease and help students move out on a tight timeline Business School’s Shih expects disruptions for nations trading with China and for manufacturers dependent on it for components for electronics, consumer products, and pharmaceuticals The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

Top 10 Perennials.

first_imgWill any perennials actually grow and flower if you can’t water them in summer’s ghastly heat?Yes.But they must be planted in fall, not spring.Spring-planted perennials will need watering. They don’t have enough roots to collect enough water to withstand droughts. The fall-planted perennials on my top-10 list can handle the drought.Top 10 Drought-bustersTo keep this short and sweet, here are the top 10 plants you can buy with complete confidence. You may plant them this spring if and only if you promise to water them the entire summer. Next year they will fend for themselves without much care.1. Salvia guaranitica. Tough and durable, it blooms from May to November and attracts hummingbirds and butterflies. It grows a thick storage root and persists even with tilling. It prefers full sun. Trimming in midsummer, after the first flowers are spent, yields a glorious fall display. It will wilt in summer heat when dry but returns with a vengeance when it rains.2. Sedum spectabile ‘Autumn Joy.’ When most sedums go dormant, this one grows into well-behaved mounds of blue-green foliage and large clusters of pink flowers with zero watering all summer. Few pests and almost no diseases affect it. Plants can be divided every four years or so in early spring.3. Clematis paniculata. Deer hate it. Drought can’t kill it. This aggressive vine spreads 10-12 feet in a season, blooms in late August and is incredibly easy to establish. A pleasant green vine, its late-summer flowers hide the vine. Cut to a foot high, it will spring back each year as if nothing happened.4. Belamcanda chinensis. The blackberry lily does well at the edges of Georgia woods without watering. It prefers highly organic soils and full sun. It’s drought-tolerant, tough and reseeds well. Planted in dense groups, it’s beautiful by midsummer. With care, it has few pests. Deer ignore it, but butterflies love the flowers.5. Kniphofia uvaria (Tritoma). Drought can’t kill this late spring-blooming plant once it’s established. Deer leave it alone, too. Properly named Red Hot Poker, it’s showy and tough as nails, but has to be established in the fall. Buy grown plants in bloom, known divisions or tissue-cultured plants (seedling color and flower shape can vary dramatically).6. Delosperma cooperii. The hardy ice plant is an asset on poor soils, dry sites and slopes, requiring only a few inches of soil. It blooms early in spring and then sporadically all summer. Fertilize in June and August, and don’t worry when frost kills it back. The tiny, gray, stem-end leaves will burst forth in spring.7. Helianthus angustifolius. The swamp sunflower is huge, with flower stalks 8 feet tall. But it will stay small (4 to 5 feet) when neglected, surviving the worst drought and hottest summer you can imagine in Georgia. The flowers are spectacular in August and September, and the plant has few pests or diseases.8. Ruellia brittoniana. The Mexican petunia is atall, late-blooming, long-lived and spreading perennial. Divide it every five years and enjoy the purple or pink flowers in August and September. Almost pest-free, it has few diseases. It will wilt in the worst drought, but comes back every time it rains.9. Narcissus hybrids. Gardeners seem to resist including bulbs in discussions of perennials, but indeed they are fantastically adapted perennials. They disappear when things get hot and then return to bloom in spring. Choose from hundreds of cultivars. No matter how bad the drought, daffodils survive.10. Lantana camara ‘Miss Huff.’ This is the only truly hardy perennial lantana. It tolerates heat, drought and cold, wet soils. Miss Huff grows into a 6- to 8-foot mound in good soil, with thousands of swallowtail-attracting flower clusters all summer. Planting on 36-to 48-inch centers is essential. Salvia guaranitica Photo: CAES Horticulturelast_img read more

Spurs end City’s unbeaten run, Arsenal snatch last-gasp win

first_imgBy Neil RobinsonLONDON, (Reuters)-Something was always likely to give when the Premier League’s two unbeaten sides met at White Hart Lane yesterday where Tottenham Hotspur swept Manchester City aside 2-0 to inflict Pep Guardiola’s first defeat as the visitors’ manager.The victory switched the focus from City’s best opening to a top-flight campaign to what has become Spurs’ finest start to a season since 1961 when they won the league and FA Cup double.No wonder Tottenham’s Argentine manager Mauricio Pochettino described their performance as “nearly perfect”.Spurs are now one point behind City, who have 18 from seven games, and one ahead of third-placed Arsenal, who lived up to their ‘lucky’ tag with a bizarre added-time winner from Laurent Koscielny’s deflection at unfortunate Burnley.Elsewhere, there were draws for Stoke City at Manchester United (1-1) and Southampton at champions Leicester City (0-0).Manchester City, who had not dropped a point in their first six games, went behind when Aleksandar Kolarov diverted a Danny Rose cross past his own keeper Claudio Bravo after nine minutes.Dele Alli added a second after good work from Son Heung-min and, with City failing to cope with Spurs’ pressing and pace, the hosts also had an Erik Lamela penalty saved by Bravo.No doubt regular taker Harry Kane would have done better from the spot, but in every other respect Spurs coped well without their injured England striker as South Korea’s Son produced another dazzling performance.By contrast, City struggled without their own missing talisman, Belgium midfielder Kevin De Bruyne, who had inspired their scintillating start to the season.Guardiola was gracious in defeat, admitting Spurs had been the better side.“They are sharper for the second ball, in England you have to control that. We had problems to control the game,” he said.EXTRAORDINARY FINISHThe day’s most extraordinary finish came at Turf Moor where Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger was celebrating 20 years in charge of the Gunners and saw his team snatch a trademark last-gasp victory just when the hosts thought they had earned a draw.As the clock ticked down, Arsenal’s Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain pounced on a knockdown by Theo Walcott and shot from close range against the elbow of their French defender Koscielny, who was looking the other way when he deflected the ball into the net.Burnley boss Sean Dyche was unhappy with almost everything surrounding the goal. “You have to question the added time, the corner and whether it should have come in, the handball and question whether we should have dealt with it,” he said.Manchester United also had a frustrating day as lowly Stoke registered their first point at Old Trafford since 1989 as Joe Allen popped up late to equalise for the visitors in a 1-1 draw after Anthony Martial had put United ahead in the 69th.Wales midfielder Allen’s second goal in consecutive games, after 82 minutes, moved Stoke off the bottom of the table, above Sunderland, and eased some of the pressure on boss Mark Hughes.Once again United’s Jose Mourinho chose to start with Wayne Rooney on the bench, bringing him on in a double substitution with Martial. Within two minutes United were ahead, though it was the Frenchman, not England’s record scorer, who netted.Despite the result, which left United in sixth place three points worse off than at the same stage last season under Louis van Gaal and five points adrift of neighbours City, Mourinho said it was his side’s “best performance of the season”.“It was much better than against Leicester (when United won 4-1 last week). It could have been 3-0 or 4-0 at halftime, 6-0 at the end of the game, but the result was 1-1. That’s football,” said the Portuguese.last_img read more