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Heaney predicts changes in church structures

first_img Google+ Pinterest Facebook Pinterest Google+ There is a crisis of conscience and conduct in the Church.That’s the view of Poet Seamus Heaney.The Derry born Nobel Laureate says the lay church will have to come more to the fore in the future, but significant change, particularly in areas such as education, will be slower than is hoped for.Dr. Heaney says the Catholic Church must find its roots again.He suggested there’s bound to be more openness and more accountability, but said he is uneasy about that kind of business-model language, saying he would prefer trust and honesty. News Previous articleDonegal politicians assessing Budget 2010Next articleN56 closed after collision near Creeslough News Highland RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Twitter WhatsAppcenter_img HSE warns of ‘widespread cancellations’ of appointments next week Heaney predicts changes in church structures Facebook 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic By News Highland – December 10, 2009 Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powers Twitter WhatsApp PSNI and Gardai urged to investigate Adams’ claims he sheltered on-the-run suspect in Donegal last_img read more

[Breaking] ‘When Exams Can’t Be Held In April With 1137 COVID-19 Cases, How Can They Be Held Now With Lakhs Of Cases?’ Shyam Divan Tells SC In Students v UGC

first_imgTop Stories[Breaking] ‘When Exams Can’t Be Held In April With 1137 COVID-19 Cases, How Can They Be Held Now With Lakhs Of Cases?’ Shyam Divan Tells SC In Students v UGC LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK14 Aug 2020 12:41 AMShare This – xWhen the UGC itself says that its guidelines are advisory in nature, they must be tailored according to local needs, submitted Shyam Divan, Senior Advocate, before the Supreme Court in the petition seeking cancellation of the UGC direction to hold final term exams by Supreme Court.Appearing for Yuva Sena, he pointed out that COVID-19 cases are rising exponentially in several states…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginWhen the UGC itself says that its guidelines are advisory in nature, they must be tailored according to local needs, submitted Shyam Divan, Senior Advocate, before the Supreme Court in the petition seeking cancellation of the UGC direction to hold final term exams by Supreme Court.Appearing for Yuva Sena, he pointed out that COVID-19 cases are rising exponentially in several states like Maharashtra. In many places, colleges and educational institutions have been converted to quarantine centres.”Universities need to keep the local situation at mind before deciding to conduct the exams”, he submitted before a bench comprising Justices Ashok Bhsuhan, R Subhash Reddy and M R Shah.Even as per the latest ‘unlock’ guidelines issued by the Ministry of Home Affairs on July 29, activities that won’t be permitted include schools, colleges and coaching institutions. The MHA has prohibited States/Union Territories from diluting the restrictions but has allowed them to increase additional restrictions. In such a scenario, how could the UGC issue directions for holding exams, asked Divan.”Nowhere does the UGC state that there has been an improvement in the health system or if there’s a new containment method”, he said after referring to the fact that the UGC itself has said that health of the students should be given paramount importance.Divan: Now we have a letter and a PIB Press Release, as well as the affidavit of the Central Govt. Divan refers to the instructions and how the guidelines of the MHA cannot be diluted under any circumstance. @anubha1812 #StudentsInSCForJustice #31StudentsInSCAgainstUGC— Live Law (@LiveLawIndia) August 14, 2020UGC cannot override the Disaster Management AuthorityDivan submitted that the UGC guidelines are subordinate to the directions issued by the Disaster Management Authority (The State Disaster Management Authority of Maharashtra has issued a direction to cancel final term exams in view of the rising COVID-19 cases. The UGC has taken a stand that SDMA cannot interfere with the conduct of examinations).He stressed that in a situation of a disaster, the directions of the DMA takes precedence, and no other authority can dilute the same.”…once you have a disaster going on where you’ve elevated the right to life, you cannot have an authority coming in and saying that they will dilute the restrictions!”, he said.”On 29 April, confirmed cases was 1137. You couldn’t hold the exams then. How would you have them now, with lakhs of cases? The pandemic is only increasing in intensity”, he said.He added that if exams could not have been held in May, they cannot be held now also.Divan: Students are a homogenous class. You cannot say that the lives of 3rd year students are less than that of a 1st year or a 2nd year student. @anubha1812 #StudentsInSCForJustice #31StudentsInSCAgainstUGC @advocate_alakh— Live Law (@LiveLawIndia) August 14, 2020[Breaking] ‘How Can There Be Exams Without Teaching? UGC Directions Arbitrary’: Singvhi Seeks Cancellation Of Exams  Students are a homogenous classHis next submissions were in reference to the UGC exempting all students other than final semester students from the requirement of taking exams. The students of intermediate years/semesters are to be given promotion based on their past performance and internal examinations.In this regard, Divan submitted that students form a “homogeneous class” as regards risk of COVID-19, and there cannot be discrimination based on the year in which they are in.Divan: Teachers and invigilators are also a homogenous class. Their health and their lives are also important. It doesn’t matter which class or which semester you teach. @anubha1812 #StudentsInSCForJustice #31StudentsInSCAgainstUGC @advocate_alakh— Live Law (@LiveLawIndia) August 14, 2020″Many students live with their families. With their grandparents and their parents. The students might not show symptoms, but they will come in contact with their families. Please have some concern for them”, he pleaded.Thousands of containment zoneHe further highlighted that there are thousands of containment zones across the country.”There are thousands of containment zones. There are sudden lockdowns being imposed. This is not a small exclusive exam, this is across the country. All streams of students will have to give this exam. Many students do not have access to technology. Where is the UGC’s sensitivity and flexibility? “He urged the bench to “look at the anxiety that the students must be going through”.After Divan concluded his arguments, the bench adjourned further hearing till next Tuesday (August 18).Earlier, Senior Advocate Dr Abhishek Manu Singhvi had made submissions for one of the petitioners, Yash Dubey (read the report of his submissions here).Complete updates from the SC hearing may be read here Next Storylast_img read more

Abortion law critics angered by handling of submissions

first_imgNZ Herald 9 October 2019Family First Comment: Conservative lobby group Family First is campaigning firmly against the legislation and its national director, Bob McCoskrie, called the situation “disgraceful”. “It’s highly controversial from both sides, so why shut that down? It’s a major change,” he said. “I think it’s patronising they can determine which submission they can hear, when you’re blocking doctors, lawyers, Pasifika leaders.” He said he believed the committee was rushing though what was a significant issue.Opponents of proposed abortion legislation say too many submitters are being turned away by a Parliamentary committee hearing public submissions on the changes.But the committee’s chair says every voice that needs to be heard will be.The Abortion Legislation Bill, which would allow women access to abortions until 20 weeks’ pregnancy without having to go through current legal loopholes, overwhelmingly passed its first reading in Parliament by 94 votes to 23 in August.A special Select Committee taking public input on the bill on Wednesday announced it had received more than 25,000 written submissions.By comparison, the End of Life Choice Bill – legalising voluntary euthanasia – received a record 35,000 submissions last year, while same-sex marriage legislation in 2012 garnered 22,000.The committee has now confirmed it will be hearing 150 submissions orally, out of 2890 who asked to speak.Conservative lobby group Family First is campaigning firmly against the legislation and its national director, Bob McCoskrie, called the situation “disgraceful”.“It’s highly controversial from both sides, so why shut that down? It’s a major change,” he said.“I think it’s patronising they can determine which submission they can hear, when you’re blocking doctors, lawyers, Pasifika leaders.”He said he believed the committee was rushing though what was a significant issue.The Abortion Legislation Committee’s chair, Ruth Dyson, said it would be highly unusual for it to hear all submissions and said the quality of the input, not the speed of the process, was the only consideration.“Hearing the same thing over and over again doesn’t add value to the committee at all,” Dyson said.“Our committee was determined to ensure that all the major organisations and the different perspectives were heard.“We made sure that we heard from providers of abortion services, that we have had people who had good or bad experiences, people who are in provincial areas, we really took a lot of time to go through the different perspectives.”The committee is expected to report back with proposed changes in February before the bill goes to a second reading.READ MORE: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?objectid=12274970&ref=twitterlast_img read more

Defense stands tall in final tune-up scrimmage

first_imgSafety Aaron Henry intercepted quarterback Jon Budmayr in practice Saturday and nearly scored.[/media-credit]If spring football can be used as any sort of barometer for where the Wisconsin Badgers’ personnel stand, one fact stood out as Saturday’s practice came to a close.The offense has a ways to go in catching up to the defense.In a practice with live tackling and situational scrimmaging, Wisconsin’s No. 1 offense started out hot, scoring touchdowns on its first two drives and covering 60 yards on both occasions.Then the defense clamped down.The second-team offense never managed to score a touchdown, and the first-teamers only got one more score when running back James White broke away on a run and took it to the house from 45 yards out.Otherwise, the defense contained the running game and shut down the passing attack.Quarterback CompetitionWith Joe Brennan routinely struggling to lead the No. 2 offense, Jon Budmayr has never been threatened during spring ball as the No. 1 starter.Yet, Budmayr has done little to cement his status as starter heading into the fall with quarterback Curt Phillips returning from injury.Budmayr tossed two more interceptions Saturday – against one touchdown – and missed several open receivers.During two attempts at a red zone drill, the No. 1 offense was unable to put the ball in the end zone, with Budmayr watching three of his passes fall incomplete. He avoided having any passes blocked at the line for the first practice all spring, but still forced too many balls into tight windows.On his first interception, Budmayr failed to look off safety Aaron Henry, who had a chance to return the pick for a touchdown if the coaches hadn’t blown the play dead.Red Zone RespectDefensive coordinator Chris Ash admitted this spring he is trying to instill a sense of swagger into his guys on “D.” If someone makes a big play, he wants them to celebrate it.Never was this more apparent than when the No. 1 defense and offense matched up for a two-minute drill. While the offense moved the ball down to the three-yard line after broken coverage allowed tight end Brian Wozniak to get free for a big gain, the defense clamped down from there.On second down, Budmayr tossed a well-placed fade route to receiver Jeff Duckworth, who managed to get both hands on the ball before being crushed by Devin Smith. The senior cornerback immediately got up after breaking up the pass and stood over Duckworth talking smack.One play later, the defense converged in the middle to keep running back Montee Ball just short of the end zone as time ran out on the two-minute clock. They left the field celebrating and chest bumping.Injury ReportFullback Bradie Ewing and linebacker Kevin Claxton both sat out Saturday, though both supposedly with minor injuries to shoulder and ribs, respectively. … Phillips did not suit up at all for the first time this spring, though that may have been because most of the practice was spent doing live work with few non-contact drills. … Jacob Pedersen got rolled up on the back of his legs and was taken off the field to have his right ankle taped up and iced. He did not return but was able to walk around on his own power.Mental MistakesAfter a season spent building a well-deserved reputation as an offense that didn’t shoot itself in the foot, the Badgers were well out of sorts Saturday.The No. 2 offensive line was hit with at least five holding penalties and at one point false-started two plays in a row.White lost a fumble to start a drive – curiously enough, it was Joel Stave’s one series with the No. 1 offense – and took a lap to pay the price.The little things that made such a big difference for the offense last season held them back Saturday.last_img read more