Monthly Archiv: June, 2021

Diary of a new academy recruit in NZ – Part One

first_imgSettling in: Ken Murray (second left) with Tom Harrison, Troy Josephs, Mitch Greenway and Jake GirdlerDAN WARD-SMITH, the former England back-row and Inside Running Academy Manager, tells us how Rugby World competition winner Ken Murray is enjoying his first few weeks in New Zealand…Ken arrived full of enthusiasm and was eager to get to know the other boys. After picking Ken up from the Tauranga bus station I took him straight to his accommodation in a guesthouse where he is staying with six other academy players, two in each room. Ken made a great initial impression by asking lots of insightful questions. He was very grateful for the opportunity to be out here in New Zealand and couldn’t wait to start training. I didn’t feel I had to stick around to help Ken settle in with the other boys; he was straight in and making himself at home.Ken is rooming with Augustin, an outside back who is a member of the Argentina Sevens squad, so there is an opportunity for them both to learn another language and find out more about life in another part of the world. I’m sure that rooming with someone who speaks another language is outside of both players’ comfort zone but that’s how you stretch yourself, through new experiences.There was a lot to get through on Ken’s first day of actual training – a physio assessment, kit and supplement allocation, and a battery of strength, power and conditioning tests. What emerges at the end of the day is a pretty good picture of what type of programme Ken needs to take care of his strength and conditioning needs. After Ken’s tests we decided that while he will be working on all areas in the gym, strength should be his number one concern rather than cardiovascular endurance or power.Ken’s training programme involves one session of whole-body strength, a session of upper-body strength, a hypertrophy session (to build muscle), an explosive power session and a pre-game primer session to get Ken ready for his weekend game. Around these gym sessions Ken has to get in one aerobic endurance session and one anaerobic interval session in each week. These would preferably be done by running or position-specific exercises like wrestling and pushing a prowler, but we can always alter them depending on his workload or injury status. Working hard: lineout practiceKen also receives personalised injury prevention exercises from our physio team to plug into his gym sessions. This gives Ken the tools to get through the heavy workload of training and playing here without breaking down.The next task at hand is the Player Development Plan. This is done to identify how Ken should be spending his time away from the S&C department. We have slots set aside for skill development where each player must be working on developing their position-specific skills. After my initial discussion with Ken we decided that he needed to be working on his ball-carrying, general body height in contact and his work over the ball post-tackle and when in the tackle assist position. We then came up with drills to point Ken in the right direction in terms of the volume needed each week and paired him up with other players who have similar work-ons.The rest of Ken’s week is made up of two skills sessions with ex-All Black Kevin Schuler, two sessions with his club side Tauranga Sports, a game on a Saturday and a recovery session on a Sunday. After all that work is completed there is still a bit of time left for Ken to enjoy the company of his academy team-mates, take in the sights of Mount Maunganui, take a dip in the hot pools or go to the beach. One final note, the other boys welcomed Ken in the traditional Maori way with a haka that was written especially for Inside Running Academy to acknowledge the journey the boys are all on towards becoming better players and people. Watch the video below and stay tuned for more updates from Ken’s time in NZ.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Six Nations wrap: The Alternative awards 2015

first_img Award for the best use of social media – #FinnocentAs Dan Biggar, arch proponent of the ‘kick and collect’ took to the air, Finn Russell, turned, like a deer caught in headlights, before the Welshman took a tumble face first over his shoulder. Yellow card, referee Glen Jackson called. Not bloody fair the Scots crowd countered, ‘he had his eyes on the ball’.The indignation ratcheted up several notches when Russell was suspended for two weeks, leading to the obligatory hashtag #Finnocent to whistle round Twitter faster than a Kim Kardashian cleavage shot. To no avail, the ban was upheld and Russell missed the Italy game.Award for best supporting role – Vincent DebatyMorgan Freeman, George Clooney, Christian Bale. Best supporting roles at the Oscars, sure, but none of them can hold a candle to Big Vincent Debaty. Not since Graham Price gave chase in Paris, in 1975, had a member of the front row union gone so far above and beyond the call of duty.The 6ft 3in, 20st loosehead, chuntered like a moose on gasoline after fleet-footed wing Noa Nakaitaci as he sped down the wing and as the Fijian was pulled down by Mike Brown and Ben Youngs, he took the pass to plop over the line. Merci, Vincent. Merci.Award for the best impression of a crash test dummy – Jules PlissonPoor fresh-faced whipper-snapper Jules Plisson. The Stade Francais fly-half still looks like his mother made his baguette before carting him off to Twickenham to face Les Anglais. She didn’t warn him about the very big boy with the red rose on his chest by the name of Courtney.Like a Great White, the 6ft 7in lock lined up his prey, accelerated and drove unsuspecting Jules into the ground, with his head shaking like a rag doll. A more legitimate example of physical violence we’ve yet to see. Plisson lay in a heap, while his own big boys, led by Yoann Maestri, ran in to deliver some retribution to Courtney. One of the most visceral moments of the tournamentAward for the best impersonation of a game of rugby – Italy 0-29 FranceMy eyes, my eyes! Please stop this. I beg you. If martians were to land on earth and be shown the Italy v France game, they’d wonder how rugby had a 150-year history, such was the torpor in a game with no redeeming features. Thirty-seven (THIRTY-SEVEN!) handling errors countless reset scrums, a paucity of skill. It was just wretched. Imagine having to commentate on that. Not one for the highlights reel, more a flame-thrower. UNWORTHY OF VIDEO ACKNOWLEDGEMENT It’s time to draw a line under what has been a rip-roaring Six Nations and before memories of Supersonic Saturday recede, dish out some much-deserved gongs Award for the best in-flight landing – Robbie HenshawIn a game of brilliant Irish execution, the only try of the game, was a piece of surgical precision that put paid to England’s Grand Slam hopes. Conor Murray looked right, raised his right index finger to give Henshaw an indication that it was going up and dinked a delicious chip over the English defence.The ball hung for a second before dropping into the dead-ball area. Alex Goode lost his bearings as Henshaw took to the air, caught the ball and with the dexterity of a 15st ballerina, managed to land inches from touch and ground the ball. It was a worthy winning try, alright.Award for the best impersonation of a nightclub – Millennium StadiumThey like to ramp things up at the Millennium Stadium. With the crisp Cardiff air seeping into the seething cauldron, before the Wales-England game, organisers decided to blow the metaphorical roof off with a pyrotechnics and lights show that wouldn’t have been out of place in a Katy Perry concert (not that I’ve been…honest).Dance music reverberated around the stadium for what seemed like an interminable amount of time while Wales and England bickered in the tunnel. England went on to win 21-16. Before the Wales v Ireland game, the disco was conspicuous by its absence. Funny that.Award for best hit on an inanimate object – James HaskellWith Wales on the ropes like a punch drunk boxer, and the English running amok in Wales’ capital in a way reminiscent of the days Will Greenwood and co. used to plunder and score tries for fun, big old James Haskell took the ball on the hoof, 10 metres from the line.The Welsh defenders, Leigh Halfpenny Alex Cuthbert and Taulupe Faletau were able to knock Haskell’s route one trajectory and he pirouetted off balance headfirst into the uprights, before bouncing back into the field of play. Such was the ferocity of the encounter that statisticians lost count of the number of tacklers. When the figures were totted up, Wales had smashed the previous tackles record by 38, racking up 250 tackles, or one every 20 seconds. That’s bravery for you.center_img https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPRGSVnyrr4Award for the best communicator – Nigel OwensA self-confessed stand-up, Mynyddcerrig’s finest was again trotting out the best one-liners in the epic England v France match. One moment that has done the rounds on social media, is when our Nige, raised his hand for an infringement and Chris Robshaw the England captain tried to get in his ear to gain a small territorial advantage.“I’m not moving”, but Sir,” it was over there”, countered Robshaw.  Arm still aloft, Owens raised an eyebrow and said ‘Christopher’ in a head masterly tone. ‘Sorry, sir’ and Robshaw backtracked, head down. ‘Thank you’. Mike Brown was similarly put in his place. A clear front-runner for the Rugby World Cup final.Award for most outrageous brain fade – Noa NakaitaciEngland were chasing points but France clearly hadn’t read the script. With the game finely poised at 7-8 and France in possession, the ball was recycled to the Stade Francais flyer Nakaitaci. He sped in unopposed from 40m and with no defenders in sight, started to run under the posts.The nearest English defender, Ben Youngs, exerted a little pressure and Nakaitaci dotted down after he had appeared to have stepped beyond his deadball line. Nakaitaci waited, praying the replay would show he’d grounded the ball correctly. He had, by millimetres. Oh mon dieu.Award for worst skullduggery of the tournament – Pascal PapeThe French pack are not renowned for their interest in knitting, dominoes and more placid pursuits. Given an inch, they’ll resort to the dark arts, more often than not. Down to Ireland and losing patience, at a ruck, all 18st of Pape ran at speed and dropped his left knee, what he thought was covertly, into Jamie Heaslip’s back to leave him in agony.Pape was shown a yellow card and given a 10-week ban, despite offering a mea culpa on Twitter.  Fortunately Heaslip has remarkable restorative powers and three broken vertebrae didn’t stop him playing a key part in Ireland’s Six Nations title.The ‘Thierry Henry’ award for alienating an Irish nation – Yoann HugetAs the denouement to Supersonic Saturday reached its crescendo and the clock went into the red, the entire population of Ireland sat open-mouthed as Yoann Huget tossed his shaggy Gallic mop to tap and go UNDER HIS OWN POSTS. Maths may not have been a strong point for La Huge as they were 20 points down but he was having none of it.Sadly, a wave of English shirts enveloped the recipient of the Huget pass, 24st, erm flyer Uini Atonio, and within seconds they were fighting for their lives. Fortunately for France, a later infringement saw Rory Kockott hoof the ball into Row Z to end the game. Madness, but how we’ve missed you France, you crazy cats.Award for passable impression of red brick wall – WalesIn the second-half of the Wales v Ireland game, between the 49th and 56th minute, Wales endured a 49-phase defensive set against a relentless Ireland who repeatedly drove into the heart of the Welsh 22. When Ireland failed to break the line, the guttural cheer from the Welsh crowd caused ripples in the River Taff. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Rocky Elsom, Jerry Collins and their ProD2 adventure with Narbonne

first_img Old enemies: Rocky Elsom and Jerry Collins scrapping it out back in 2004 Proud ProD2 outfit Narbonne are battling hard to avoid the drop despite an ambitious Australian overhaul that saved the French club. By John Davidson The Parc des Sports Et de L’Amitie stadium was rocking, flares were going off and the fans celebrated with gusto. Racing Club de Narbonne Mediterannee, better known as RC Narbonne, had just pulled off a famous ten-point derby win over arch-rivals Perpignan. Saturday’s victory, inspired by a two-try haul from former All Black Jerry Collins, had given Narbonne a tiny amount of breathing space in its relegation dogfight. With just four matches in France’s ProD2 season left, the Orange and Blacks sit in 14th place on 41 points, the same number as 13th ranked US Dax and one point above Bourgoin in 15th place.Of the three clubs, Narbonne has the easiest run in and crucially faces both Bourgoin and US Dax on its home turf. It is in the box seat to survive and there’s no denying that relegation would be a bitter blow after the heights of the 2013-2014 campaign. In the previous season Narbonne had finished fifth, with 18 wins from its 30 matches, and had almost gone up to the Top 14. The small club from Languedoc-Roussilon had gone down to Agen 25-17 in the semi-finals, but had performed admirably.In comparison, 2014-2015 has tough. Narbonne lost its scrum-half, ex-Wallaby Josh Valentine, to a big-money move to Beziers while a number of other key players departed. The club has been plagued by injuries and for the past few weeks the likes of half-back Brett Sheehan and forward Lei Tomiki have been sidelined. But the January arrival of New Zealand great Collins from the wilderness, as the medical joker replacement for former Australia skipper Rocky Elsom, has helped spark a turnaround.Big time: Lei Tomiki for Narbonne in the Top 14 in 2007Narbonne have won three of their past five matches and will be boosted by the return of Tomiki and Sheehan before the end of the season. “Last season no one expected anything and we did really well,” Tomiki says. “And this year, it was probably the same thing but I think everyone’s kind of caught on to it. We’re a bit of a target. The main focus is to stay up. I think the boys are up for it.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Remaining in ProD2 is vital for a club as ambitious as Narbonne and for one that has experienced a huge amount of change in the past few years. Relegated from the Top 14 in 2008, it almost went under three years ago. Bought by an Australian consortium and now majority-owned by Elsom, Narbonne’s finances have been brought back into control. Employing their own version of a rugby ‘Moneyball’ strategy, Elsom and fellow Australians in club president Anthony Hill and coach Justin Harrison have cut costs and initiated a restructure. Using their southern hemisphere contacts they have brought in a load of antipodean cattle, a mixture of seasoned Super Rugby professionals and younger players, and paired them with local French talent.Showing you how it’s done: Justin Harrison playing with BathUnable to compete with the big bucks thrown around by the larger club, Narbonne have raised performance standards and increased its reliance on state of the art sports science programs to close the gap. The club’s model is to spot talent early and develop it, selling it on to rival outfits when necessary, while at the same time increasing its sponsorship base and financial strength. New sponsors have been enticed, crowds have gone up and Narbonne’s engagement with the local community has increased. “That’s one thing I found about coming to Narbonne, the whole culture of the place and the community gets behind their team,” Sheenan says. “It’s their passion… obviously we haven’t had the best success on the field this year but they still rock up. They celebrate with you and they bleed with you. It’s a great environment to be in.” French rugby is changing rapidly and Narbonne want to be part of that bright future. The Top 14 may be swimming with cash but the step up to that top level is not easy. Narbonne’s mixture of sound spending, canny recruitment and innovation is different to the ProD2’s status quo, but could pay off in the long run. “You want to tilt the probability dramatically in your favour to be able to win,” Elsom explains. “It’s one thing that good teams do all the time. So New Zealand certainly have excellent players, but they also have things stacked in their favour because they’ve made it that way. Things like the performance program, the talent and development programs, so the young guys coming through. And also better utilising the resources in the town, connecting with other sports and having a stronger link with the average punter.”In the May issue of Rugby World – in shops now – we talk to some of the former Test stars and career pros plying their trade in ProD2. Find out where to buy your copy here or download the digital edition here.last_img read more

2019 Rugby World Cup TV Coverage

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-Ups Who Are ITV’s Rugby World Cup Pundits? Rugby World Cup Groups Expand 2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-Ups Expand Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 Sun 13 Oct Namibia 0-0 Canada (match cancelled due to Typhoon Hagibis)POOL CSat 21 Sep France 23-21 Argentina (Tokyo)Sun 22 Sep England 35-3 Tonga (Sapporo)Thu 26 Sep England 45-7 USA (Kobe)Sat 28 Sep Argentina 28-12 Tonga (Osaka)Wed 2 Oct France 33-9 USA (Fukuoka)Sat 5 Oct England 39-10 Argentina (Tokyo)Sun 6 Oct France 23-21 Tonga (Kumamoto)Wed 9 Oct Argentina 47-17 USA (Kumagaya)Sat 12 Oct England 0-0 France (match cancelled due to Typhoon Hagibis)Sun 13 Oct USA 19-31 Tonga (Osaka)POOL DSat 21 Sep Australia 39-21 Fiji (Sapporo)Mon 23 Sep Wales 43-14 Georgia (Toyota)Wed 25 Sep Fiji 27-30 Uruguay (Kamaishi)Sun 29 Sep Georgia 33-7 Uruguay (Kumagaya)Sun 29 Sep Australia 25-29 Wales (Tokyo)Thu 3 Oct Georgia 10-45 Fiji (Osaka)Sat 5 Oct Australia 45-10 Uruguay (Oita)Wed 9 Oct Wales 29-17 Fiji (Oita)Fri 11 Oct Australia 27-8 Georgia (Shizuoka)Sun 13 Oct Wales 35-13 Uruguay (Kumamoto)KNOCKOUT STAGESSat 19 Oct QF1 England 40-16 Australia (Oita)Sat 19 Oct QF2 New Zealand 46-14 Ireland (Tokyo)Sun 20 Oct QF3 Wales 20-19 France (Oita)Sun 20 Oct QF4 Japan 3-26 South Africa (Tokyo)Sat 26 Oct England 19-7 New Zealand (Yokohama)Sun 27 Oct Wales 16-19 South Africa (Yokohama)Fri 1 Nov Third-place Play-off New Zealand 40-17 Wales (Tokyo)Sat 2 Nov RWC 2019 Final England 12-32 South Africa (Yokohama)Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Who will be providing punditry from Japan as… 2019 Rugby World Cup TV CoveragePOOL AFri 20 Sep Japan 30-10 Russia (Tokyo)Sun 22 Sep Ireland 27-3 Scotland (Yokohama)Tue 24 Sep Russia 9-34 Samoa (Kumagaya)Sat 28 Sep Japan 19-12 Ireland (Shizuoka)Mon 30 Sep Scotland 34-0 Samoa (Kobe)Thu 3 Oct Ireland 35-0 Russia (Kobe)Sat 5 Oct Japan 38-19 Samoa (Toyota)Wed 9 Oct Scotland 61-0 Russia (Shizuoka)Sat 12 Oct Ireland 47-5 Samoa (Fukuoka)Sun 13 Oct Japan 28-21 Scotland (Yokohama)POOL BSat 21 Sep New Zealand 23-13 South Africa (Yokohama)Sun 22 Sep Italy 47-22 Namibia (Osaka)Thu 26 Sept Italy 48-7 Canada (Fukuoka)Sat 28 Sep South Africa 57-3 Namibia (Toyota)Wed 2 Oct New Zealand 63-0 Canada (Oita)Fri 4 Oct South Africa 49-3 Italy (Shizuoka)Sun 6 Oct New Zealand 71-9 Namibia (Tokyo)Tue 8 Oct South Africa 66-7 Canada (Kobe)Sat 12 Oct New Zealand 0-0 Italy (match cancelled due to Typhoon Hagibis) 2019 Rugby World Cup TV CoverageFast becoming one of the most anticipated and watched sporting events in the world, the rights to televise the Rugby World Cup every four years have become sought after by most broadcasting companies.Back in 2011, ITV secured the rights to televise the 2011 and 2015 tournaments by paying roughly £60 million. Considering the 2015 tournament was a huge success, the costs have soared.But who has secured the 2019 tournament rights?In 2017 it was announced that ITV have secured the broadcasting rights for the 2019 Rugby World Cup in Japan, as well as the 2023 tournament held in France.Related: Full 2019 Rugby World Cup Fixture ListNiall Sloane, ITV Director of Sport said: “The Rugby World Cup has become a fixture every four years on ITV, so, following such a successful tournament in 2015, we’re delighted to be able to announce we will continue to be the competition’s home until 2023.”Bill Beaumont, World Rugby Chairman said back in 2017, “We are delighted to be partnering with ITV in an exciting long-term deal. Great events are built on great partnerships and we are excited to be working with ITV, a long-term supporter of Rugby World Cup, to further fan-experience and rugby growth within the UK over the next eight years.”Related: Who Will Be ITV’s Pundits?“As host broadcaster, ITV was at the heart of the success story (of the 2015 tournament), bringing fans closer to what was the best-attended, most-viewed, most-competitive and most socially-engaged Rugby World Cup ever and while this was a highly-competitive process for one of rugby’s most prized broadcast rights, we were impressed by ITV’s passion for the sport and continued broadcast innovation.”Additionally all the games will be televised on eir Sport in Ireland and that will be fronted by former Ireland winger Tommy Bowe. He will also be joined by Gordon D’Arcy, Peter Stringer, Jerry Flannery and will women players Eimear Considine and Loise Galvin. RTE2 will televise 14 games including all of Ireland’s pool matches and every knockout stage match.S4C are showing live coverage of the opening match, all of Wales pool games and certain knockout matches as well.But for those of you looking to enjoy the tournament on the radio do not fret either as BBC Radio 5 Live or Sports Extra will provide commentary on all 48 matches. Sonja McLaughlin and Matt Dawson will present the coverage with Chris Jones commentating alongside people like Gareth Lewis and Sarah Orchard.Watching outside the UKDon’t miss a minute of the Rugby World cup, even if you’re abroad. A VPN provider like ExpressVPN can protect your privacy as well as unblock geo-locked content so you can access your home broadcasters coverage even when away from home. Try risk free with a 30 day money back trial. Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 A rundown of the Rugby World Cup groups… Rugby World Cup Groups Who Are ITV’s Rugby World Cup Pundits? Rugby World Cup Fixtures The 2023 Rugby World… Held in Japan for the first time, make sure you know where all the games are being televised. Take a look at all the matches that… Collapse Success: Due to the high 2015 tournament viewing figures, the cost of broadcasting rights has soared (Getty Images) Expand Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

France Six Nations Fixtures 2021

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS France Six Nations Fixtures 2021France played two Six Nations fixtures at home and three away in 2021, and ultimately finished second in the table. See below for their match results.Related: France Six Nations SquadFrance Six Nations Fixtures 2021(All kick-off times are GMT)Round 1 Sat 6 February, Italy 10-50 France Dupont dazzles as France crush Italy in Six Nations openerRound 2 Sun 14 February, Ireland 13-15 France France win in Dublin for first time since 2011Round 3Fri 26 March, France 23-27 Scotland Scotland beat France in Paris for first time in 22 yearsRound 4Sat 13 March, England 23-20 France Antoine Dupont scores after 65 secondsRound 5Sat 20 March, France 32-30 Wales Late Brice Dulin try denies Wales a Grand SlamDon’t miss a game with our TV coverage guide2020 Six Nations ResultsRound 1Wales 42-0 Italy Reaction: Josh Adams scores a hat-trickIreland 19-12 Scotland Reaction: Stuart Hogg drops ball over the lineFrance 24-17 England Reaction: France’s fire-up youngsters overcome EnglandRound 2  Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram France ended this year’s championship in second placecenter_img Ireland 24-14 Wales Reaction: Jordan Larmour’s brilliant footworkScotland 6-13 England Reaction: England hold nerve in sodden Calcutta Cup boutFrance 35-22 Italy Reaction: France go top after blowing hot and coldRound 3Italy 0-17 Scotland Reaction: Stuart Hogg scores scorching try in RomeWales 23-27 France Reaction: France keep Grand Slam bid on trackEngland 24-12 Ireland Reaction: Sexton fumble leads to George Ford tryRound 4Ireland 50-17 Italy Reaction Hugo Keenan scores double on Ireland debutEngland 33-30 Wales Reaction: Wales score stunner to bring clash to lifeScotland 28-17 France Reaction: Mohamed Haouas sent off against ScotlandRound 5Wales 10-14 Scotland Reaction Scotland win in Wales for the first time since 2002Italy 5-34 England Reaction Ben Youngs marks 100th England cap with two tries against ItalyFrance 35-27 Ireland Reaction: Cian Healy scores try on 100th Test appearanceSix Nation Squad and Team NewsEngland Six Nations SquadWales Six Nations SquadScotland Six Nations SquadIreland Six Nations SquadFrance Six Nations SquadItaly Six Nations Squad2019 Six Nations ResultsRound 1France 19-24 Wales Reaction: Yoann Huget howler gifts George North try in Wales’ comeback winScotland 33-20 Italy Reaction: Blair Kinghorn scores hat-trick in Six Nations try-festIreland 20-32 England Reaction: Henry Slade scores braces as England beat IrelandRound 2Scotland 13-22 Ireland Reaction: Jacob Stockdale scores a try, makes a try and stops a tryItaly 15-26 Wales Reaction: Wales equal record winning runEngland 44-8 France Reaction: Jonny May scores 30-minute hat-trickRound 3France 27-10 Scotland Reaction: Watch incredible Romain Ntamack tryWales 21-13 England Reaction: Wales stay on track for Grand SlamItaly 16-26 Ireland Reaction: Ireland struggle to see off ItalyRound 4Scotland 11-18 Wales Reaction: Watch the tries as Wales beat ScotlandEngland 57-14 Italy Reaction: Joe Cokanasiga entertains as England crush ItalyIreland 26-14 France Reaction: Johnny Sexton scores classic loop tryRound 5Italy 14-25 France Reaction: Marco Zanon error costs Italy victoryWales 25-7 Ireland Reaction: How Wales won the Grand SlamEngland 38-38 Scotland Reaction: England and Scotland draw in closerFollow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Bouncing back: Galthie and Ollivon head a team with redemption in mind (Getty Images) last_img read more

Communion resolutions open the table for discussion

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Steph Houghton says: Joseph S. Ferrell says: Joseph F Foster says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Martin Stern says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET May 15, 2012 at 7:27 pm God calls and welcomes each person. Joining in the Body of Christ through worship and communion will pull people of any background to know and learn more, and if not, they will go onward on their spiritual journey refreshed to the place they will meet God. Asking people who are beginning to recognize their relationship to God to stop and take classes doesn’t seem to be Jesus’s way. He often interacted with foreigners, Gentiles, and those cast out by religious authorities. May 16, 2012 at 2:25 pm Of course, the Council at Jerusalem did agree that circumcision was not required, but they did not abandon all requirements, did they? Peter argued on the basis of evidence that their hearts had been purified. Although not mentioned in Acts 15, we see baptism today as one of the signs of that purification of hearts. It requires an examination and committment to be baptised. That goes a long way toward looking at Eucharist as a holy sacrament, and not a token of simple welcome, like a peace pipe or handshake.I would agree with the sentiment that we should not have baptism police at the rail. But if somebody who we know to be unbaptised presents herself for communion – and let’s agree that she’s looking for deep healing love and welcome – perhaps there’s a more fruitful way to meet that need? Perhaps she REALLY needs prayer and discipleship, and perhaps eating a wafer without any understanding is actually NOT going to be very helpful. Rector Shreveport, LA P. LePine says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Andy Hook says: Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC May 16, 2012 at 8:48 am AMEN! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL May 16, 2012 at 9:41 am The earliest church had a similar problem – what to do about outsiders, Gentiles who had not been properly circumcized – But “God who knows the heart, showed that he accepted them by giving the Holy Spirit to them, just as he did to us…for he purified their hearts by faith.” (Acts 15.)Of course there is a relationship between baptism and Eucharist – just as there is a relationship between confirming our faith and being initiated into it in baptism. Still we expect that these relationships will become clearer as we mature, especially when we baptize infants. But John Wesley was right that communion may itself be a “converting sacrament.” The order of receiving God’s good gifts – including the gift of faith itself – cannot be guaranteed or assumed. And it does not need to be. IF we believe that Christ Jesus is really present in the communion we share, then the experience of his presence can serve as the God-welcome people without any previous experience of Jesus sometimes desperately need before they formally enter a community of faith.I would not think of urging unbelieving or even unbaptized people to come to communion – but I want to be very sure that any who DO come, believers or not, baptized or not, receive that deep healing love and welcome of God present to them – which is what we ourselves seek – and always need. May 16, 2012 at 11:31 pm Amen.Every stewardship season the Church asks people to make a commitment to God and God’s Church through pledging their time, talent, and treasure. Yet somehow asking someone to pray to God (the Daily Office does not require baptism… and why shouldn’t laypeople and catechumens be taught how to pray the Daily Office?) and make a commitment to Christ in Holy Baptism before coming to the table is too much. Asking someone to give themselves to God before they eat the Body and Blood of Christ is “too exclusive.” Why would you partake of something unless you believe the truth of the message, and if you believe in the truth of the message then why would you not follow through with baptism? David Griswold says: P. LePine says: Cody Blair says: May 31, 2012 at 10:13 am Your example demonstrates that an “open table” policy can lead newcomers to full inclusion in the church community, and yes, this should be our goal. But the choice now before the church–either to assert or to delete the canonical rule against communing the unbaptized– leaves us with no model for open communion in the context of baptismal formation. The Eastern Oregon proposal would declare that God’s hospitality is the entire focus of the eucharist, as if the fuller implications of discipleship imparted through baptismal formation plays no part in the sacrament’s meaning. The church needs to reflect on how to revise the canon in a way that opens the table without marginalizing baptism. The articles by Ruth Meyers and Bishop Breidenthal in the current issue of Anglican Theological Review are thoughtful starting points. Michael Smith says: Submit a Job Listing May 17, 2012 at 1:47 am But then, weren’t all of the original Apostles Jewish? From what I understand, baptism is closely linked, arguably derived directly, from the mikvah practice in Judaism, which is used to remove ritual impurities and initiate converts. So it might actually be safe to assume that they *had* been baptized.Even without that, though, Jesus took part in John’s baptism. John is even reluctant to do so! Plus, John (the gospel) names several Apostles as having previously been followers of John (the Baptist). And, of course, there’s the Great Commission: the risen Christ told the Apostles to baptize, and according to Acts and Paul, they did so eagerly. Bob Griffith says: The Rev. Cathy Cox says: Andy Hook says: May 16, 2012 at 1:25 am When I walked into my church a little over two years ago I was a 36 year old woman who had never been baptized. I made a point of letting the congregational development director know I hadn’t been baptized, which is when I learned there are exceptions to this “law” made openly and knowingly. Soon after, as part of greeting us before the service, the priest gestured to the altar and said, “This is Christ’s table, and we don’t believe he would turn anyone who seeks a relationship with him away. All are welcome at his table.” I went to the rail that day, and nearly every Sunday since. I was baptized along side my three children a few months later, and confirmed along side my eldest a few months after that.Now I serve as Clerk on the Bishop’s Committee, will cast the lay vote for my church for the Bishop Suffragan in a couple of weeks, and have started a discernment process. My children serve as acolytes and my husband works as both a greeter/usher and as the Treasurer. All of which helps our beloved little church and none of which would have been possible if it weren’t for the exception that allowed the priest to love me as Christ’s own even before I bore the mark that will last forever.It was Love that brought me to the rail, that drew me to baptism, that stirred my enthusiasm for learning about the Episcopal Church through confirmation, and it continues to be that genuinely unconditional love that fills my heart as I serve my life as a proud Episcopalian.I see the Open Table as simply the next step to living a more Christ like life as a church, which I sincerely hope continues to be our goal as we move into the future. Submit an Event Listing May 16, 2012 at 2:10 pm Why do you imagine a fence, and not a gate? Who is not tall enough to see? If there is such a person, the clergy can give them a boost rather than tear down the fence. May 15, 2012 at 10:40 pm I think Fr. Martin has hit the nail on the head (as has Mr. Green [below]). If opportunities for teaching are not taken, how then are we preaching the Gospel? Discipleship is not some warm comfort zone in which one is not challenged. If the Eucharist (and other Sacraments) is bereft of the inward and spiritual grace we carry forth from Baptism, which most of us learn initially through instruction, perhaps it is not even important that one self-identify as Christian, or that the Church be that of the Body of Christ.I also do not believe in “governing the altar rail,” nor would I refuse an individual request to receive Communion if I did not know one’s baptismal status. May 15, 2012 at 8:31 pm I think we should respect the Canons, though there is no reason why, if we disagree with them, we should not work toward reforming them. In the old days (according to the 1662 BCP and its offshoots) those who received communion were to “be confirmed or desirous of confirmation.” Perhaps the Canon for those who are permitted to receive communion should be amended to “those who are baptized or desirous of baptism.” The Episcopal Church’s General Convention faces questions about who may receive communion. Photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service] The young woman who called St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Hood River, Oregon, was upset and asked if the church offered communion.“I really need some support right now and I feel like it starts there,” she told the Rev. Anna Carmichael, the parish’s rector.The wrinkle was that while the woman had attended various churches she had “never formally been baptized and yet somehow this needing to be in community and needing to be supported, in her mind, had something to do with communion as well,” Carmichael recalled.“I just couldn’t tell her no, I’m sorry we can’t offer that to you,” the Diocese of Eastern Oregon rector recalled during a recent interview.There is a tension, Carmichael said, between “the theology behind the importance of baptism,” something she said is “incredibly significant to me,” and “the very lived reality that people need to be supported in their community.”Therein lies an example of the thinking behind Eastern Oregon’s proposal that General Convention allow the church’s congregations to “invite all, regardless of age, denomination, or baptism to the altar for Holy Communion.” Eastern Oregon’s Resolution C040 would pave the way for this invitation by eliminating Canon 1.17.7, which says “no unbaptized person shall be eligible to receive Holy Communion in this Church.”It is one of two resolutions on this topic the convention will consider when it meets July 4-12 in Indianapolis. The Diocese of North Carolina has proposed a longer-term look at the issue. Resolution C029 calls for a special commission to conduct “a study of the theology underlying access to Holy Baptism and Holy Communion” and recommend to the 78th General Convention any amendment to Canon 1.17.7 it believes is needed.The texts of both resolutions are available here. Eastern Oregon’s is accompanied by a diocesan statement explaining its stance.This will be the second time in recent years that what is variously called open communion, open table and communion of the non- or unbaptized has come to convention. In 2006, the General Convention affirmed Canon 1.17.7 (via Resolution D084) and asked for the House of Bishops Committee on Theology and the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music to provide to the 2009 meeting of convention “a pastoral and theological understanding of the relationship between Holy Baptism and eucharistic practice.”In its report to the 2009 convention, the SCLM said it had been in contact with the bishops’ committee and “stand[s] ready to cooperate with them on this important issue in the future.”The bishops reported that a study was “on-going.” In June 2009, the committee circulated “Reflections on Holy Baptism and the Holy Eucharist: A Response to Resolution D084 of the 75th General Convention,” which was later published in the Anglican Theological Review. The committee called it a “promissory note” because “we do not assume this is our last word on these matters.”“It is essential to understand the doctrinal and liturgical connections between baptism and eucharist, especially in a church that has been rediscovering the centrality of baptism,” the members wrote in their conclusion. “We invite the church into this work.”This year, the bishops’ theology committee reported in the Blue Book (beginning on page 51 here) that it is “undertaking a renewed engagement with the theology of the Eucharist.” They noted what they call “the continuing (and controversial) practice of inviting the un-baptized to receive communion” and suggested what is needed is “a renewed and fundamental understanding of the eucharistic assembly and of eucharistic celebration as the quintessential gathering of the people of God.”Carmichael said Eastern Oregon began discussing what she called this “issue of practice versus theology” during its 2010 convention and agreed to submit a resolution to General Convention.“For many of the folks out here in the diocese we have already started living into the practice, which I know gets us in a sticky situation but it’s reality,” she said, adding, “we don’t check ID at the door” and strangers who come up to receive communion are not asked if they have been baptized.“We feel like it’s been a lived reality for us and we imagine that that may be true in other dioceses as well,” Carmichael said.The Rev. Canon Beth Wickenberg Ely, canon for regional ministry in North Carolina and chair of that diocese’s convention deputation, echoed that sentiment. “Our gut reaction is that we’re not the only ones facing this,” she said in a recent interview. “We think that this is probably true for every single diocese.”“Every Sunday we face this,” she said. “It’s not just a Christmas and Easter thing. If something is that much part of our lives together, we really need to bring this out in the open and talk about it.”Hence, the diocese’s proposal that the church study the issue.Deputy Joe Ferrell, a professor of public law at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, championed his diocese’s resolution not because he opposes an open table, but because “we have a canon that specifically prohibits it and my view has always been we don’t get to pick and choose the laws that we will obey unless we’re impelled by a higher moral authority, and I don’t think this issue is compelled by higher moral authority, so we need to do something about the canon.”Ferrell said that if he “could wave my magic wand” the canon would be repealed.“We’d be left with rubrics of the Prayer Book, which I think are perfectly adequate,” he said in an interview. Reminded that the Book of Common Prayer is silent on the issue, he chuckled and replied, “that’s right, that’s right.”Having been raised in the Episcopal Church, Ferrell, 73, remembers prior to the 1979 Book of Common Prayer when Eucharist was not the principal service each Sunday and when communion was rarely a part of weddings and funerals.“Now it’s commonplace and, particularly at weddings and funerals, you’ve got severe pastoral problems if you attempt to restrict who is going to be welcome at the altar,” he said. “And you have it to some extent on Sunday mornings.”His “bottom line” is this: “clergy who feel that this is important from a pastoral point of view should not be put in a position of knowingly violating a canon that could not be more explicit.”The Episcopal Church’s canons have contained a version of Canon 1.17.7 only since 1982, even though baptism as a pre-requisite for Holy Communion is rooted in the earliest part of the early Christian church. It appears that explicitly stating the tradition in the Episcopal Church canons happened due a legislative compromise between two competing resolutions. At the 1982 meeting of convention in New Orleans, deputies and bishops faced two resolutions dealing with the canon titled “Of Regulations Respecting the Laity” (then numbered Canon 16 of Title I).Resolution A48 (submitted by the Standing Commission on Ecumenical Relations and available beginning on page 60 here) was prompted by a mandate from the 1979 convention that it show how the church could implement the then-six-year-old ecumenical statement, “Toward a Mutual Recognition of Members,” which called for an understanding that baptism initiates people into the entire Christian church, according to the 1989 supplement to Edwin White and Jackson Dykman’s classic Annotated Constitution and Canons (available via a link here).Resolution A78 (submitted by the Standing Liturgical Commission and available beginning on page 154 here) was based more specifically on the understanding that the Episcopal Church now considered baptism to be one’s entrance into the full life of the church. (In many, if not most, parts of the Anglican Communion, confirmation is still required before receiving communion.)“The two resolutions reflected specific persuasions and purposes that differed sharply,” the supplement’s authors wrote. “Deputy Charles Crump of Tennessee, sensing the problems inherent in these proposals and the vast legislative time and debate which would be consumed on the floors of each House, crafted Resolution A048 as a compromise.”The changes reflected in all three resolutions felt revolutionary to many. Allowing unconfirmed people to receive communion was a major change, as was the accompanying implication that children did not have to reach an undefined “age of reason” before coming to the altar rail.The age tradition lingers in some families and in some parts of the Episcopal Church. The Episcopal Church is still working to rewrite its canons to conform to the 1979 Book of Common Prayer’s baptismal theology. A summary of some of that work done by the Standing Commission on Lifelong Christian Formation and Education begins on page 153 of this year’s Blue Book.Still, the requirement of baptism before Eucharist remains and hearkens to the early church. For example, the Didache, a catechism dating from the late 1st or early 2nd century, tells Christians, “… but let no one eat or drink of your Eucharist, unless they have been baptized into the name of the Lord …” And scholars suggest there is evidence from early church liturgical sources, including The Apostolic Tradition of Hippolytus of Rome that non-baptized members of the Christian community had to leave the eucharistic liturgy altogether after the proclamation of the word.Carmichael would hearken to an even earlier source.“This is our construction around this issue because Jesus never said you have to have baptism before you have dinner with me,” she said. “So, this is our mess that we’ve created and sometimes I wonder in the grand scheme of all things how much this really matters. When we get to heaven is Jesus going to be more excited that we invited people or is he going to be more excited that we said you can come, but you can’t?”Wickenberg Ely in North Carolina places at least part of the issue against the question of diversity. “I think we’ve had the diversity conversation ad nauseum but, I don’t think we’ve had it in the context in the open table,” she said in an interview. “To me that’s about diversity, so who are were going to leave out? The answer, the biblical answer to that is: [leave out] nobody who wants to come.”The open-table issue is also part of the Episcopal Church’s struggle “about who are we as a church in the 21st century,” she said.Wickenberg Ely noted that many people who come to church are often “looking to be welcomed wherever they go and whatever they believe.” Yet, there are some churches that say “if you are to be a member of our community in Christ this entails discipline and commitment, so that belonging is not just by virtue of being a child of God, but it is by virtue of being willing to pledge yourself to this way of being of a child of God,” she said, adding that this is the stance of the Roman Catholic church.The Episcopal Church could be “known as a church that is welcoming of anyone at the Lord’s Table, willing to entertain questions, willing to dialogue with people of all beliefs and no beliefs — a generous stance as a church,” she suggested.“Do we want to be known as a church like that going into the future? Or do we want to be known as a church that has some boundaries, [legal and canonical] expectations, also with [practice] and educational expectations, or do we want to be in the middle?” she asked. “I mean, who are we going to wind up being? This is just one of the things about that big discussion in my mind.”Those questions frame up an even larger context for the communion issue. Removing the baptismal requirement for participation in communion would undoubtedly have major ecumenical implications. In 2008 the Inter-Anglican Standing Commission on Ecumenical Relations rooted its opposition to an open table in the once-revolutionary recognition of a common baptism, noting that that acceptance “has made ecumenical ventures possible.”In The Vision Before Us the commission warned that “a move toward the official communion of the non-baptized undercuts, threatens, and in the end denies basic ecumenical tenets.” The members also noted that Anglican credibility in ecumenical conversations is threatened when Anglican texts say one thing, but practice suggests another.“The practice of admitting non-baptized people to the Eucharist overthrows a century of ecumenical insight and growth,” they conclude.The women who called St. Mark’s looking for support has been coming to the parish regularly, and Carmichael said the two of them have “regular conversations about how she can become more involved in the community and that that includes, when she’s ready, the decision to be baptized.”“It’s not a prerequisite to being able to participate in community life, but that it is an adult decision about her faith and that I am happy to walk in the journey with her when she’s ready,” Carmichael said.Read more about itHere is a selected list of additional resources (beyond those linked to above) about the issue of unbaptized people receiving communion:“Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry” (Faith and Order Paper No. 111, the ‘Lima Text’), World Council of Churches Faith and Order commission (1982)Open, the journal of the Associated Parishes for Liturgy and Music, essays“Baptism and eucharist: challenges,” now-Diocese of Upper South Carolina Bishop Andrew Waldo (2000)“Baptism and communion,” the Rev. Dr. Stephen Reynolds (2001).Anglican Theological Review essays“Baptism, Eucharist, and the Hospitality of Jesus: On the Practice of ‘Open Communion,’” the Rev. James Farwell (2004)“In Praise of Open Communion: A Rejoinder to James Farwell,” Dr. Kathryn Tanner (2004)“A Brief Reflection on Kathryn Tanner’s Response to ‘Baptism, Eucharist, and the Hospitality of Jesus,‘” the Rev. James Farwell (2005)“Opening the Table: The Body of Christ and God’s Prodigal Grace,” the Rev. Stephen Edmondson (2009).“Who May Be Invited to the Table?,” the Rev. Dr. Ruth Meyers (2012)“Discerning Open Table in Community and Mission,” the Rev. Donald Schell (2012)“Following Jesus Outside: Reflections on the Open Table,” Diocese of Ohio Bishop Thomas E. Breidenthal (2012)— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service.In Spanish: http://bit.ly/JpdrhD May 17, 2012 at 10:28 am But WHY do you believe that Jesus would offer communion? (It’s a fairly amusing proposition to begin with, since the whole idea is predicated on us doing it in his memory, not in his presence!) And by what authority do you assert that refusal is not loving your neighbor? Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA May 15, 2012 at 8:31 pm Since the Episcopal Church loves compromises, or says it does and with some historical justification, let me suggest this one. (Re)adopt the Eastern Orthodox (and some Byzantine Roman Catholic) churches’ practic of the antidoron bread. Specific ministratation details vary, but it is bread left from the prosphora read more

Prayer Book, Liturgy and Music subcommittee statement on blessings

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Nancy & John Cox says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Jim Stockton says: Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska General Convention 2012, Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Liturgy & Music, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS July 9, 2012 at 2:31 pm It grieves me that we propose a provisional liturgy BEFORE we”undertake further study during the next three years on how the blessing of lifelong, committed same-sex relationships relates to Christian theology and scripture” Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY July 10, 2012 at 4:36 pm We have been studying this issue too long. It is time we accept all and bless all relationships in our congregations! Would Christ do? He wouldn’t have waited so long.We are a anglo couple in our 70’s who believe that the arms of Christ are large enough to encircle and accept everyone. Posted Jul 9, 2012 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Human Sexuality, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 July 15, 2012 at 9:24 pm Please see the following citation concerning “product” and “process”. From my perspective as a heterosexual male, husband, father and a committed Christian who takes Communion from a “Common Cup”, I remain concerned about the moral, spiritual, and physical health of our beloved Church. The Lessons of History[1]Intellect is a vital force of history, but it can also be a dissolvent and destructive power. Out of every hundred new ideas, ninety-nine or more will probably be inferior to the traditional responses which they propose to replace. No one man or woman, however brilliant or well informed, can come in one lifetime to such fullness of understanding as to safely judge and dismiss the customs or institutions of his or her society, for these are the wisdom of generations after centuries of experiment in the laboratory of history.Therefore, the conservative who resists change is as valuable as the radical who proposes it-perhaps as much more valuable as roots are more vital than grafts. It is good that new ideas should be heard, for the sake of the few that can be used; but it is also good that new ideas should be compelled to go through the mill of objection and opposition. This is the trial heat that innovations must survive before being allowed to enter the human race. It is good that the old should resist the young, and that the young should prod the old. Out of this tension, as out of the strife of the sexes and the classes, comes a creative tensile strength, a stimulated development, a secret and basic unity and movement of the whole.——————————————————————————–[1]Durant, W. and A. Durant. 1968. The Lessons of History, Simon and Schuster, New York, N.Y. 117p. (citation (pp.35-36) edited for continuity and inclusiveness without altering content). Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments (7) Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET July 9, 2012 at 4:51 pm I support the resolution. I am a happily married heterosexual male. I am want all people to have happy marriages regardless of their orientation. My wife and I were married in 1996 at St. Michael’s Anaheim. We had a Nuptial Mass. So should everyone. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing July 9, 2012 at 5:55 pm I left the ECUSA in 2001. Two years later I completely changed religions. One of the reasons was because I could not go to my parish/cathedral priests and ask for a marriage ceremony. It is so sad that there needs to be more study and thought put into something that should have already been a liturgical staple of the church for many years. In my new faith tradition, we have had full LGBT inclusion and the ability to marry in our community centers since 1995. Our national council, which is equivalent to the House of Bishops, deliberated the matter for thirty minutes before deciding it was the right thing to do. The test of an institution’s heart and philosophy can be seen in its behaviour. I look back at the ECUSA with great fondness, but it saddens me that it is so far from the correct path still. Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 9, 2012 at 2:59 pm Beware. The illusion that we have arrived at the pinnacle of revelation or reason is a primary tool of the devil. Similarly, the claim that further study is necessary before the Church makes a decision, even a provisional one, is based on a false premise. We will do well to note that the phrase ‘further study’ presumes the fact that much study has already been done on the proposition of blessing same-sex unions. Calling for further study is a well-worn tactic of those who desire neither further study nor consequent change to their established prejudices and biases. We all have them. We all have to remain open to uncomfortable change and on-going further study as essential to living and lived relationship with God. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Prayer Book, Liturgy and Music subcommittee statement on blessings Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Tags An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Dianne Lowe says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Sheila Hays says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Stephen P. Hayes, Ph.D. says: Comments are closed. Rector Knoxville, TN July 9, 2012 at 3:50 pm I heartily support the adoption the proposed document “I will bless you and you will be a blessing”. I am hard pressed to understand the rancor around this document. The Church has blessed animals, objects, land, and people always. This is just another way in which the gathered community blesses on another. And yes, as jurisdictions permit marriage, the marriage blessing should be offered by the church– with all reckless abandonment and joy. Thanks to the subcommittee for the wonderful work done thus far. David Justin Lynch, Esquire says: Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, General Convention, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Same-Sex Blessings Michael Coffey says: [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The following statement has been issued by Deputy Ruth Meyers of Chicago and Bishop Thomas Ely of Vermont, chairs of the Cognate Subcommittee on Blessings of the Committee 13, Prayer Book,The Committee on Prayer Book, Liturgy and Church Music at the General Convention has approved Resolution A049 (amended), which would authorize a provisional rite and accompanying resources for blessing same-sex relationships. The legislation moves next to the House of Bishops.The resolution asks the General Convention to authorize the liturgy for provisional use and calls for a review process before the next General Convention in 2015. This is clearly a work in process, and there is a place in that process for all Episcopalians, whether or not they agree with the action we are taking today.The committee’s resolution also asks the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music (SCLM) to undertake further study during the next three years on how the blessing of lifelong, committed same-sex relationships relates to Christian theology and scripture, and to reflect on the matter with our sisters and brothers throughout the Anglican Communion and with our ecumenical partners.In response to testimony presented at a hearing on Saturday evening, the committee made several changes to the original draft, titled “Liturgical Resources I: I Will Bless You and You Will Be a Blessing.”As the theological resource says, “all of us have more to learn from Scripture and from each other.” The resolution proposes that bishops be able to authorize adaptation of the resources to meet the needs of the people in their dioceses, particularly in states with legal marriage equality or civil unions for same-sex couples. As we pray the liturgy in our own communities and contexts, we will understand more about where the Holy Spirit is leading our church.The resolution proposes that the liturgy be authorized for provisional use in Episcopal churches beginning on December 2, 2012, which is the first Sunday of Advent and the beginning of the church’s liturgical year. Congregations and clergy that wish to use the liturgy must have the permission of their bishops.Deputy Ruth Meyers of Chicago and Bishop Thomas Ely of Vermont, chairs of the Cognate Subcommittee on Blessings of the Committee 13, Prayer Book, Liturgy, and Church Music. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Should confirmation be required?

first_imgShould confirmation be required? Rector Collierville, TN Judith Wood says: Newark Bishop Mark M. Beckwith laying on hands during a confirmation service at Trinity & St. Philip’s Cathedral in Newark. Photo/Nina Nicholson[Episcopal News Service] When the Rev. Canon Lee Alison Crawford told vestry members church canons required they be confirmed, an anguished junior warden resigned.“As the (former) rector of a congregation whose average Sunday attendance was under 50, which gave me a core group of maybe 30 people, I usually found out by accident that somebody hadn’t been confirmed,” recalled Crawford, during a recent telephone interview.She refused his resignation. “I said to him, you are one of the most faithful people I know. You already have a leadership position. You understand the church. In a small congregation I would say confirmation for leadership is an ideal but in theory and practice it doesn’t always happen,” said Crawford, a General Convention deputy from Vermont.“With the change in theology in the 1979 prayer book, with baptism the root of everything we do, confirmation is a rite looking for a theology,” she added.The confirmation requirement for leadership was the subject of intense conversation but not much consensus at the 77th General Convention in Indianapolis, said Deborah Stokes, a lay deputy from the Diocese of Southern Ohio.Ultimately, General Convention rejected or referred for further conversation several resolutions proposing removal (A042, A043) or review (A044) of confirmation as a requirement for church leadership.“We felt very strongly this was just the beginning of the conversation,” said Stokes, co-chair of the legislative committee on education, which considered the resolutions. “I didn’t want to lose confirmation, and I think all of us feared losing it if it’s not a requirement for something.”Rather than eliminate it the proposed changes intended “to free confirmation to be a response to baptism, a pastoral response that might occur in various ways in people’s lives,” said the Rev. Ruth Meyers. The Hodges-Haynes Professor of Liturgics at the Church Divinity School of the Pacific, she consulted with the Standing Commission on Lifelong Christian Formation, (SCLCF) which authored the resolutions.She was surprised by the reaction to the proposed changes. “People had the sense that, by taking it out of the canons, we were wanting to do away with confirmation. That’s absolutely not the case.”Rather, the canonical changes were intended to offer options. “We could just say that baptism, with some instruction in the history and governance of the church, is really what you need for leadership” allowing confirmation to follow “as a response to baptism at a time that makes sense to you.”Bishop Porter Taylor of Western North Carolina, SCLCF vice chair, said the changes would make the rite more a response to the movement of the Holy Spirit and less “a hoop that we have to jump through. We don’t see confirmation as part of our governance.”“And this is not about saying I want to be a member of the Episcopal Church,” he said during a recent telephone interview. “This is about saying that God has been doing something in my life and I want to mark that by standing up in the midst of the congregation and having the bishop lay hands on me in order to mark the movement of the Holy Spirit.”For Lillian Sauceda-Whitney, who was confirmed May 6 at St. Margaret of Scotland Church in San Juan Capistrano, California, confirmation felt like “I had finally found my home. It was like being baptized.”Bishop Stacy Sauls, chief operating officer of the Episcopal Church confirmed the 59-year-old preschool teacher and more than a dozen others on behalf of Bishop Jon Bruno of Los Angeles.“I had tears of joy,” Sauceda-Whitney recalled during an Aug. 23 telephone interview. “I really wanted to belong. I thought, it’s time for me to stand up and say I am an Episcopalian. I thought the only way to do that would be to join the church.”Whether confirmation is required of church members in general and leaders in particular since it is no longer needed to receive communion, is a conversation that needs to happen organically, at all levels of the church, especially in the parish, said the Rev. Elizabeth Kaeton, a retired priest in the Diocese of Newark.“It’s about belonging,” Kaeton said during a recent telephone interview. “I think we’re still not clear in our society and that’s reflected in our church, about what it means to belong. In the church we’re trying to figure out what it means to be an Episcopalian. We’re also struggling with what does it mean to have a public profession of faith.”Rather than being tied to a rite of passage or an age, confirmation should be linked to a process of Christian formation,” she said. “It’s an exciting conversation. We’ve stopped talking about sex and now we’re talking about money and baptism and confirmation and marriage and these are important things.”Another education committee member, the Rev. Charles Holt, rector of St. Peter’s Church in Lake Mary, in central Florida, said he was relieved and grateful that “none of the resolutions passed General Convention.Had they passed, theoretically, “all one had to do to be an elected leader at the highest levels was to have taken communion three times over the course of last year” or be a communicant in good standing, he said. “Conceivably, they could not believe in Jesus Christ as their Lord and personal savior and be a leader in the Episcopal Church.”The conversation about confirmation is essential and a healthy one because “it makes us recommit ourselves and come to clarity about our core beliefs and wrestle with our faith,” said Holt.Holt also believes confirmation “is actually the one thing a bishop can do to help grow the Episcopal Church. In the Episcopal Church, it’s the bishop’s job to make sure that every single person who’s a member of our church has made a mature profession of faith in Jesus Christ” – a moment he believes every Christian should experience.“If we do away with confirmation then we don’t have that moment for people,” he said.Making confirmation a powerful and personal moment is of utmost importance for Bishop Dorsey Henderson, who retired from the Diocese of Upper South Carolina in 2009. He now assists on behalf of Bishop Gregory Brewer of Central Florida at confirmations.Henderson confirmed about 18 people at St. Peter’s Church on May 17, including eighth grader Grant Williams, 13, who believes “confirmation is very necessary.“It felt like I was coming closer to God, like I was getting to know him better and confirming my faith in him by showing that I truly believed in him and wanted to follow him,” he said.Henderson said he adds the names of each confirmand to a personal notebook he has kept over 15 years of the episcopacy. “I assure them that I will pray for them regularly by name and I ask them for their prayers.”While confirmation “is not essential to receive the sacrament of Holy Communion … it provides a kind of spiritual boost” especially to those baptized as infants and those converting from other traditions, he said during a recent telephone interview.Bishop Dan Martins of the Diocese of Springfield, said confirmation evolved the way it did because of practical necessity—because dioceses grew and “bishops could not multi-locate.”What began as one service including baptism followed with laying on of hands by the bishop and a prayer for the gifts of the Holy Spirit over time “was separated and priests were authorized to celebrate at the water portion, with the understanding that at some point they would bring the newly baptized to the bishop for the laying on of hands. “Eventually it took on a life of its own as a separate event and acquired the name confirmation,” he said during a recent telephone interview.The rite may evolve, but bishops remain a symbol “of the wider church, our organic connection to church through time and space,” he added. “The prayer may change, the name we use is in flux, but … as the sacramental sign of ministry, then it’s important that everybody come under the hands of the bishop at some point in their public profession of Christian faith and discipleship.”The Rev. Tom Woodward, a retired priest residing in New Mexico and a long-time General Convention deputy, believes baptism and confirmation should both be delayed, to about 16 and 26 respectively, to allow for more mature professions of faith.“A child in middle school or high school who’s being baptized—his or her friends would come to that service and it’s a powerful witness of the decision to be baptized,” he said during a recent telephone interview. “Confirmation class would include a discernment of ministry and gifts, Then, when the bishop comes to invoke the Holy Spirit it would be very similar to the ordination process, adding to the dignity and power of commission of lay ministry in the world.”Timing had everything to do with confirmation for Karen Lander, 45, and Henry Lutz, 14, also confirmed May 6 at St. Margaret’s in San Juan Capistrano by Sauls.“I decided since I was sending my eight-year-old to her first communion classes, it was time for me to do my confirmation as well,” Lander said during a recent telephone interview. “I have to be an example to her. I needed to learn more about the church instead of just going to church.”For Lutz, who is entering the ninth grade this year it was a communal experience. “The bishop put his hands on me, and the priests and my family did the same.“I gained a wisdom through the whole experience. I understand what I’m doing with the Bible, what I can interpret from God and so many parts of the Episcopal Church. I interpreted it as a sign of how I’m taking my faith to a different path now, knowing that I’m getting a stronger faith and ready to do more.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. August 28, 2012 at 4:57 pm Attempted takeovers of TEC congregations by dissidents make me believe that we need some kind of significant and explicit commitment to TEC’s polity from lay persons who aspire to serve on vestries. It may even be prudent to require such commitments from those who vote in vestry elections. My concern is not theological but practical. Confirmation has served as such a commitment, but it’s an imperfect one. As long as we devise and require a suitable commitment to TEC’s polity, we can drop Confrmation from the various diocesan canons.As for Confirmation itself, I believe the future is to understand and observe it as Reaffirmation, per the 1979 BCP. It won’t survive otherwise. There is a lesson to be learnt here: eliminating Confirmation as a requirement to receive Holy Communion effectively killed Confirmation. If we eliminate Baptism as a requirement to receive Holy Communion, we will effectively kill Baptism. Don’t kid yourself into believing otherwise. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Frank and Dog Jeffrey. says: The Rev. Canon Nancy Platt says: Andy Hook says: Rector Bath, NC Alma T. Bell says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Judy Elliott says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books August 28, 2012 at 4:40 pm Bishop Dan Martins is correct about the evolution and separation IN THE WESTERN CHURCH of the Sacrament of Holy Baptism and Holy Confirmation. IN THE EASTERN CHURCH this never happened, and the Sacrament of Holy Baptism and Chrismation (Confirmation) are still celebrated within the same liturgical action. The Chrism used for Confirmation in the Eastern Churches is blessed by the Bishop with his deligated authority for the Priest to Baptize and Chrismate …..’Sealed by the Holy Spirit’ (Confirm) the individual within one Liturgical act. I think that our present Baptismal Liturgy hints at this with the use of Chrism and the words “Sealed by the Holy Spirit (in Baptism ) and marked as Christ’s own for ever” Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bob Mason says: August 28, 2012 at 4:16 pm Andy., why don’t you just leave the Episcopal Church. We are losing loyal members and the last thing that I need is to read is your personal wise cracks. therefore, this is not the site for this kind of Attitude debate. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME August 28, 2012 at 4:12 pm Confirmation is such a grand mass. I’d say, let the worshipers make the choice.However, it is in the 1979 BCP. and it’s a wonderful service. and a chance to meet the Bishop.Also, the Blessings of our Pets. they are also put on the Earth to give us Love and Affection. Comments (61) Course Director Jerusalem, Israel David Yarbrough says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Harry W Shipps says: Nancy Sjoholm says: August 28, 2012 at 4:12 pm I have heard from my friends outside the Episcopal Church that their impression of the ECUSA is that it is a club buffet – select what beliefs you want, nobody cares. Very sad. Father John H. Shumaker says: August 29, 2012 at 12:48 pm Amen! August 28, 2012 at 5:41 pm People of course may discover they can do without Communion. Quite a number of Protestant denominations have it only occasionally and make no big deal about it. And there are groups of Russian descended Starovery ‘Old Believers’ who are bespopovtsy ‘without priests’ who with a lay leadership only have kept the Orthodox Faith since the 1600s. Submit a Press Release August 28, 2012 at 10:31 pm Confirmation of one’s baptismal grace is a problem why? Isn’t it also the step that one takes to pledge loyalty – to be counted on as a responsible churchman/churchwoman: “Will you continue in the apostles’ teaching and fellowship…”? We should all have to answer that question for ourselves and be trained to take on a responsible role in the passing on/support of the faith. David Yarbrough says: Richard Vanderlippe says: August 28, 2012 at 4:27 pm Return Baptism to an adult rite and you won’t need confirmation. Confirmation is a reaffirmation of one’s baptismal vows and what two month old is going to remember what his parents, godparents and the church got him into. Confirmation, by the way, should probably also be an adult rite offered when a person is ready to make a commitment to Jesus and live and exercise the Christian life as best as he or she can. The problem with teenage confirmation is that he or she may have absolutely no understanding of it’s purpose as the whole experience goes in one ear and out the other. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: Joseph F Foster says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Doug Desper says: August 28, 2012 at 5:14 pm Ultra-inclusion is exactly what Jesus wanted! Jessica Dye says: Nancy Trimble says: Frank and Dog Jeffrey. says: August 29, 2012 at 10:18 am Amen, James. General Convention 2012 August 28, 2012 at 5:26 pm I would add my voice to those who consider “Life Long Learning” as the true measure of one’s commitment to a life in Christ. Confirmation as an individual practice in each parish or, more reasonably, in each diocese is a variable that is only one part of what should a a continuing process.Unfortunately my experience is more like “been there, done that, now there is no need to do anything further as a disciple. EfM taught me so much more than my “reaffirmation of faith” and was truly the most significant part of what has become, for me, a life long journey of faith and service. Jeff Sharp says: August 28, 2012 at 4:33 pm Realistically there is a difference between the baptism of a young person/adult and an infant. In the case of the baptism of an infant the promises and commitments in the Baptismal covenant are spoken on behalf of the child by the parents and grandparents. It only makes sense that if one really understands the nature of discipleship as outlined in the New Testament that there must come a time in a baptized infants life when he/she affirms those promises for him/herself. That happens to some extent when the Baptismal covenant is recited, but it also happens in a very powerful way at Confirmation. For me, the question one should ask is, Why does a person reject confirmation if they really have decided to follow Christ? We don’t make confirmation an expression of “holier than thou”, but a conscious, mature affirmation that one does indeed want to follow Christ as Savior and Lord. As for church leadership, one would expect someone who is mature in faith and conduct, knows or is willing to learn the position for which he/she is being chosen to lead, has demonstrated the gifts that are necessary for that position. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs August 28, 2012 at 5:33 pm Confirmation is already required, in that, by historic accident, it was and presumably still is originally part of the Sacrament of Holy Baptism – at least that is what was taught in Seminary. Therefore the question should really be, should we return Confirmation to the Sacrament of Holy Baptism? Unfortunately, early on in the Church, the Bishops delegated the water portion of Baptism to the priests while they themselves retained the Chrismation (Anointing with Holy Oil) for the time when the Bishop would come and “complete” the Sacrament. In Church History, one could find a variety of numbers of “sacraments” that were observed in the ancient Church; for example 33 sacraments commemorating the age of Christ and I read once up to 44 sacraments were observed. It was finally settled upon 7 and even after the Reformation, the 2 Dominical Sacraments (Baptism & Eucharist) were always “required” of a Christian, while the “others” were seen throughout Anglican history with a rather jaundiced eye. So if Confirmation is the completion of the Sacrament of Baptism, perhaps it should be required. Why? For the those who observe infant Baptism, it would and could be the adult self-affirmation of the Baptismal questions, renunciations & vows which a person can make, with confidence and on their own before their family, Church, priest & chief pastor, the Bishop. On the other hand, if being Baptized with water and anointed with holy oil by the priest is sufficient for membership in Holy Mother Church and to also receive the Sacrament of Holy Communion, does it not also make sense that this is only what is needed for leadership in the Church? Yet, for example in our Diocese, one could be a member of the Vestry and not be confirmed. However, to be a Warden, one must be Confirmed in the Church. Then too those who are seeking Ordination must also be Confirmed…so we’re stuck with the “haves” and the “have nots.” Now consider this…why is it necessary for a Bishop to Confirm? If license was given to a priest to Baptize and to Preside at Holy Communion, why couldn’t a priest also Confirm members of his/her Parish? The Orthodox Church both Baptizes and at the same time Confirms infants and adults. That means that Confirmation is done by an Orthodox priest – also meaning that Baptism & Confirmation are ONE Sacrament. One little known fact is the in some instances, Roman Catholic priests can Confirm members of their congregations and they’re not Bishops! So what shall we do as Anglicans, about this Confirmation “thing?” Sometimes it seems that the Church is more interested in the “speck” in the eyes of our traditions and teachings than in the “Log” which is causing blindness in the Episcopal Church. Instead of nurturing the teachings, faith and traditions of the Church, our Churches are becoming more and more empty, yet we’re still “trendier than thou,” ultra inclusive and always neither too hot or too cold in offending anyone’s sensibilities. It’s like we’re going out of our way in the Episcopal Church to make elbow room in a place without elbows. Does that make sense? If we teach that Holy Baptism & Confirmation are one Sacrament in 2 parts, linked by faith and tradition to each other, then I can’t see that we’re far from the kingdom. Baptism and Confirmation is and always had a “special relationship;” one that welcomes, one that grants membership into the Christian family, one that plants the seed of faith into our lives and one that, upon becoming an adult, can enable us to re-affirm all this means and therefore “Seal” it all with the love, gift and blessing of God’s Holy Spirit. Believing that then, the question of “leadership in the Church” becomes a rather mute point. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC August 28, 2012 at 8:11 pm My understanding in ECUSA is that Confirmation is the formal acceptance and reception into the Church BY A BISHOP of a baptized person who is making a formal commitment (Baptism in other traditions being recognized as equivalnt to baptism in the Episcopal Church). It is generally observed in common with Reception of persons who have been confirmed BY A BISHOP IN APOSTOLIC SUCCESSION (i.e., Roman Catholic, Orthodox, or even dissenting Anglicans), recognizing their prior confirmation but receiving them into this communion. It would be up to General Convention to allow Bishops to delegate this authority, and up to Bishops to choose to delegate or not.The central point is not so much the symbolic application of Holy Chrism as the public expression of a believer’s mature commitment to Christ and His Church – appropriately the basic requirement for leadership. Vestrypersons, let alone wardens, who have not been confirmed really should not hold the office.Also, while I can’t speak for the entiriety of the Roman Catholic Church, I note that in the RC diocese of Charlotte confirmation is frequently performed by the Vicar General, a priest whose primary function is similar to our Canon to the Ordinary position. While he doesn’t hold the order of Bishop he is specifically delegated to perform this function – essentially functioning as an assisting Bishop – and the function is not delegated to parish priests as such. Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Dick Fish says: August 28, 2012 at 5:45 pm As a longtime member and leader in the Presbyterian Church, I was received into the Episcopal Church in 1993. When Bishop Talton held my head in his strong hands and spoke to me, I felt the presence of the Holy Spirit in that sanctuary. The rite was meaningful and sacred and beautiful. I would hope that all lay leaders, especially Vestry members have the opportunity to experience that power. I can’t imagine why anyone would not want to be confirmed or received.Thank you, Pat, for a very clear article, and for all the interesting comments which it generated. Marylin Day says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 August 28, 2012 at 5:53 pm OH My Let’s look at this more closely. The “new” 79 Prayer book allows 3 options: confirmation reception and reaffrimation of baptismal vows. Each is appropriate in a unique pastoral setting. however I do not believe that setting is membership on a vestry when baptism ( and of course commitment to a particular congregation in terms of presence and stewardship) should be sufficent. Having encounter resistence on the part of a prospective vestry member who had been baptized in the Episcopal church, I suggested he simply reaffirm his baptismal vows which made sense and was acceptable to him, to me and to the church, when his son was confirmed. let’s keep it simple. August 28, 2012 at 5:47 pm Why would someone who is active in the Church want to avoid confirmation? September 5, 2012 at 2:02 am The Roman Catholic Church added 5 sacraments as a response to the Reformation.I think we should return to our roots with Chrismation just a part of Baptism. I think it would be very meaningful for us to renew our Baptismal vows as adults if we are in line to accept leadership responsibilities.Let us not let ourselves be confused or diluted by what the Roman Catholic Church did merely to solidify it’s political control over it’s “members”, or rather “serfs” as they were in reality when all this as going on. August 28, 2012 at 4:16 pm There is no national canonical requirement that vestry members be confirmed. That is left up to diocesan canons. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI August 28, 2012 at 8:21 pm Why would an Episcopalian look for a workaround to Confirmation – especially when the workaround was being done during a Confirmation service?I would think that it would be a unique blessing for father and son to be confirmed together. Christian Paolino says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rev James Hodson says: Rich Friel says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI David Yarbrough says: Joseph F Foster says: Bruce Thomas says: August 28, 2012 at 8:07 pm It has always been my understanding that Vestry members should always be Baptized, at the least, but Wardens had to be Confirmed also, I continue to support that. Why change thatqualification for the leadership in our parishes? Confirmation demonstartes a mature profession of one’s faith in front of the congregation, and we experience a powerful feeling of the Holy Spirit when the Bishop’s hands are placed upon our heads. I will never forget that awesome feeling nearly 50 years ago. Richard Vanderlippe says: Featured Jobs & Calls Christopher L. Webber says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC The Rev. James C. Pappas III says: Mark Fraizer says: Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 August 28, 2012 at 7:36 pm I should have been a little more careful with my words. I should have said that it the preparation for confirmation that is a big variable. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS August 28, 2012 at 6:35 pm I’m glad you pointed this out, Bp. Epting, it is just what I was thinking as I read the article! August 28, 2012 at 7:36 pm For churches like ECUSA which practice infant baptism, Confirmation is the only vehicle by which one makes a formal, mature profession of faith before the congregation (discounting those of us who are recovering Southern Baptists, and others who made a mature profession of faith at baptism). The extent to which it is “a rite looking for a theology” is a function of the extension of Holy Baptism to those who are not able to profess faith for themselves – which has been debated for centuries.This mature public profession of faith is the issue, not the theology of Confirmation or the “spiritual boost”. Church leaders should without exception have made such a public profession. Julia Langdon says: August 28, 2012 at 5:18 pm Interesting coincidence that this should appear today. Here are my reflections: http://telling-secrets.blogspot.com/2012/08/confirmation-birth-of-activist.html An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Fr. Steven A. Scarcia says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis August 28, 2012 at 7:05 pm I came from another denomination. Probably 2/3 on average of people in my congregation and most meetings I attend came from another denomination. Many people do not understand the polity or history of the church that they attend; they are only concerned with the doings of their parish, maybe dimly aware of the diocese and almost no interest beyond that except among sacristy rats like me. I believe Confirmation could serve — as it did for me — as a strong personal milestone when you commit to the church you’re in, and — if it has a reasonable educational program (maybe an online one that can be done at one’s own pace?) that covers the basics — is not too much to ask those in leadership roles. However, rather than a “hoop to jump through” it should be seen as a goal and — if done right — be a wonderful spiritual moment as Nancy described above. I know it was for me. For those whose previous church experience was negative, a rite of initiation feels like coming home.I understand that many parishes and even dioceses are struggling. But the answer is not to keep dropping our standards. Submit a Job Listing Featured Events August 29, 2012 at 11:04 pm And why do you suppose you / we’re “losing loyal members”? Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Christopher Epting says: Russ Post says: Chuck Till says: Rector Tampa, FL Comments navigation Newer comments Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL By Pat McCaughanPosted Aug 28, 2012 Press Release Service August 28, 2012 at 12:47 pm Let’s get rid of the requirement of confirmation for leadership!Let’s get rid of the requirement of baptism for communion!Let’s get rid of the requirement of Jesus to be a priest!Let’s get rid of the name church since we want to do whatever feels good all in the name of ultra-inclusion! General Convention, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA August 29, 2012 at 6:52 pm I hear you Frank and Jeffrey, but I am very cautious about inviting people to leave. I think we may need to hear more of Andy’s reasons for his feeling so strongly. Adelaide Kent says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA August 28, 2012 at 5:38 pm I cannot think of many groups or organizations which do not require that their leaders have an understanding of their purpose, rules of order, beliefs, history, etc. Why is what we believe, as Episcopalians, not important for those who wish to serve on vestries, be wardens, handle funds,etc? No one is required to take such roles but anyone who does should know how we express of beliefs and what it means to be Episcoplanian. Doing away with the requirement for confirmation means that we can choose leaders who do not really know what they are leading. Comments navigation Newer comments Comments are closed. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ August 28, 2012 at 7:06 pm I would agree with the description of Confirmation being a rite looking for a theology. Confirmation is so often presented as rite of commitment, where the baptized come and make an affirmation of the baptismal promises made on their behalf ment years before. The problem in my experience is that in most cases following confirmation we never see these people again. I believe the true sacrament of commitment is participation in the Eucharist. Some which can be done week after week as we recommit ourselves again and again to the life of the Church. August 28, 2012 at 10:22 pm I had thought the main purpose of confirmation as opposed to baptism, which makes one a Christian, was to accept the baptized person as a member of the Episcopal Church.As a practical matter, it also gives the person who was baptized in infancy the opportunity to speak for him-or herself. I was confirmed at age 33, and it mattered a lot to me.As far as the matter of Vestry members being confirmed it would seem logical that they belong to the church they are going to help run. Besides it is no big deal to be confirmed if you have not already been confirmed at 13 or 14. September 27, 2012 at 5:21 pm I was Baptised on the 9th TH September and felt so happy. I left the Catholic Church after 70 years and I love my NEW church and the wonderful Pastor Sally.I asked to be Confirmed as well and know that I have already been Baptised and Confirmed in the Catholic Church.But I am an Episcopal now and want to be part of that church all the way.I feel so peaceful in church. August 28, 2012 at 6:06 pm Growing up in the church, every Sunday offered Morning Prayer at the main service, with Communion one time each month, unless, of course one went to the 7am service. Happily that is no longer the case, and Communion is now the central focus of every service. Although it MAY be time to re-think Confirmation, let it take several years to resolve, just like the blessing of same-sex unions is taking years of listening! Michael McCoy, M.Div. says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA August 29, 2012 at 2:57 pm I was about to ask where the notion came from that Vestry member must be confirmed! I grew up in a parish that had a Warden who wasn’t even a member of the Episcopal Church. I think that was quite common at one time and derived from the notion that community leaders should take responsibility for the church in their community and that the church benefited from the insights and leadership of community leaders whether they were members or not. Doesn’t that fit better with the notion of a catholic church rather than the narrowness of a sect? August 28, 2012 at 5:11 pm Resolution A042 at General Convention this year went too far when it proposed removing confirmation as a requirement for the various types of lay ministries in Canon III.4.1 “Of Licensed Ministries.” Those are not positions of “governance” — most, if not all, of them should in my opinion require a “mature public affirmation of faith and commitment to the responsibilities of … baptism.” Those who drafted that resolution did what Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery did: they went “a bridge too far” when they included that portion of the canons to apply this blanket removal of confirmation as a requirement for various positions in the Church. August 29, 2012 at 3:30 pm Chuck Till,Please tell me that I’m misreading — you want to replace the sacramental rite of Confirmation with some political affirmation of fealty to TEC? Would it become a requirement then and berets distributed?I’m beginning to wonder if I belong to a church or a quasi-communist group with liturgy and processions. August 28, 2012 at 4:31 pm The positive observations above concerning Confirmation ring true. If Confirmation is no longer required for leadership but left only to those who want to make a ‘response’ to Baptism, it will quickly disappear.last_img read more

‘Fill the Ford’ a successful vehicle for feeding Missouri’s hungry

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Poverty & Hunger Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events ‘Fill the Ford’ a successful vehicle for feeding Missouri’s hungry Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img By Maria L. EvansPosted Mar 25, 2013 Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Donors in Kirskville, Missouri, filled almost three pickups with food for the local Christian Community Food Depot on March 23. Photo/Maria L. Evans[Episcopal Diocese of Missouri] For the members of Trinity Episcopal Church, Kirksville, Missouri, the impending arrival of Winter Storm Virgil brought a blizzard of blessings.One of Trinity-Kirksville’s most longstanding outreach ministries has been contributing to the local Christian Community Food Depot. Despite the illusion of abundance of food in America’s heartland, 17.1 percent of people in Adair County are food insecure, and 55 percent live at 130 percent or less of federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program poverty levels, according to Map the Meal Gap statistics. Additionally, according to the Annie E. Casey Center, 42.5 percent of schoolchildren in Adair County qualify for free or reduced school lunches. One neighboring county has a rate of 67.8 percent.“There’s tremendous need here,” said Trinity’s vicar, the Rev. Johnnette Shane. “The need also tends to be invisible because, for many people, it’s still considered shameful to ask for help. So it is wonderful that the people of Kirksville were so generous.”Last August, Trinity held a “Fill the Ford F-150 Food Drive” at a local grocery store, and parishioners were amazed to received donations of more than two pickup-truckloads of food. They did not expect as much generosity with the looming threat of snow and 35-degree temperatures on March 23.They were mistaken.Kirksville grocery shoppers donated almost three pickup-truckloads of food.“As people made their own purchases to prepare for an impending storm, it was heavily gratifying that the community made such a grand gesture of support for Adair County’s hungry,” said Trinity Bishop’s Warden Kevin Minch.“Winter months often bring the greatest need in local food banks,” Minch noted. “This winter has been uniquely harsh in Missouri.”For the dozen or so Trinity parishioners who volunteered at the event, it was a continuous opportunity to meet and greet the givers. It was not unusual for donors to admit they had been recipients of the local food bank in times past. Some donors placed more food in the truck than they took back to their cars. One woman walked from her house to the drop-off point five times to bring canned goods to the food drive.But perhaps the most amazing incident came from an elderly couple who, the previous day, had sold their family farm to move into town. Parishioner Arla Snow had met the husband of the pair earlier in the day at the store. Later, they returned and motioned for her to come closer.“Here,” they said, pressing an envelope into her hands. “Wait until we drive away, and give this to your priest. When we were a young married couple, we were so poor we held onto the nails of the bedpost and prayed that God would simply help us through to the next day. We want you to have this.”Snow delivered the envelope, marked “to Trinity Episcopal Church, for your Fill the Ford F-150 Food Drive.” Inside was an anonymous note … and $500.“God did bless us in the chance to facilitate that wonderful couple to give so much,” said Shane. “They had tears in their eyes as they gave, and we had tears in our eyes as we received.”— Dr. Maria L. Evans is a member of Trinity Episcopal Church, Kirksville, Missouri. Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

Instalado Moisés Quezada Mota como obispo coadjutor de la República…

first_imgInstalado Moisés Quezada Mota como obispo coadjutor de la República Dominicana Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Posted Feb 17, 2016 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Consecrations, Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Latin America Rector Belleville, IL El Rvdmo. Moisés Quezada Mota fue instalado, el 13 de febrero en Santo Domingo, como obispo coadjutor de la Diócesis [episcopal] de la República Dominicana. Foto de Julius Ariail para la Diócesis de la República Dominicana.[Diócesis de la República Dominicana] El Rvdmo. Moisés Quezada Mota fue ordenado y consagrado obispo coadjutor de la Diócesis Episcopal de la República Dominicana el 13 de febrero en Santo Domingo, en la eucaristía de clausura de la 58ª. convención diocesana anual. El obispo primado Michael Curry presidió el oficio que se celebró en el estadio de voleibol del Centro Olímpico Juan Pablo Duarte.El nuevo obispo coadjutor fue electo el 25 de julio de 2015, en una convención extraordinario de la Diócesis de la República Dominicana en la catedral de la Epifanía de la ciudad de Santo Domingo. Quezada Mota sucederá al obispo Julio César Holguín como el cuarto obispo de la República Dominicana cuando Holguín se jubile.Una de los muchos grupos de portaestandartes que desfilaron durante la instalación. Foto de Julius Ariail para la Diócesis de la República Dominicana.Más de 1.500 personas presenciaron la consagración, en la cual participaron 21 obispos y 100 presbíteros, diáconos y seminaristas de todo el ámbito de la Iglesia Episcopal. Estudiantes de muchas de las escuelas episcopales dominicanas encabezaron la procesión en el estadio con vistosas banderas y estandartes.Curry ofició como el consagrante principal y entre los coconsagrantes se encontraban el Rvdmo. Holguín; el Rvdmo. Telésforo A. Isaac, segundo obispo de la República Dominicana, quien también predicó el sermón; el Rvdmo. William J. Skilton, obispo auxiliar de la Diócesis de la República Dominicana (jubilado);  el Rvdmo. Wilfrido Ramos-Orench, obispo de la Diócesis de Puerto Rico y el Rvdmo. Lloyd Allen de la Diócesis de Honduras. Entre los invitados especiales había representantes de la Iglesia Evangélica Dominicana, una de las más grandes denominaciones protestantes del país.El obispo primado Michael Curry con su traductora, Dinorah Padro, y el Rdo. Michael Hunn, canónigo del Obispo Primado para el ministerio dentro de la Iglesia Episcopal.  Foto de Julius Ariail para la Diócesis de la República Dominicana.Como el primer Obispo Primado que asiste a una convención de la Diócesis de la República Dominicana, Curry fue portador de saludos de la Iglesia Episcopal, felicitando a los asistentes por “la vitalidad de la Diócesis de la República Dominicana como parte de la rama episcopal del Movimiento de Jesús”.Él también encomió a Holguín al decir: “Gracias a Dios por tu largo y apostólico ministerio. Cuando los gigantes andan entre nosotros, debemos darle gracias a Dios por ellos. Vuestro obispo ha sido una voz para los que no tienen voz, una luz para los que no tienen luz”.Holguín se encuentra ahora en su 25º. año de servicio, y es actualmente el obispo diocesano de mayor antigüedad en la Cámara de Obispos de la Iglesia Episcopal.Quezada esta casado con Mary Jeannette Pringle, que diseñó e hizo la capa, la mitra y la estola que le presentaron a su marido en la ceremonia. La pareja tiene dos hijos, varón y mujer, quienes le presentaron la mitra, la estola y la cruz pectoral a su padre, y cantaron como parte del Ministerio Adonai, un grupo musical episcopal dominicano, durante la ceremonia.Antes de su elección, Quezada sirvió como vicario en las iglesias de Jesús Nazareno y el Buen Pastor en San Francisco de Macorís. Él es graduado del Centro de Estudios Teológicos, el seminario episcopal de Santo Domingo, y fue ordenado sacerdote en 1983. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS House of Bishops, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH last_img read more