Tag Archiv: 新龙凤419

Honor 8X phone looks glorious in shifting purplyblue finish at CES 2019

first_img Honor View 20’s hypnotic colors will make your jaw drop Phantom blue Honor 8X is pure eye candy The Honor View 20 may be Huawei’s only new phone at CES 2019 (and, in fact, the only satisfying phone of the entire show), but the company threw in a bonus device. Or rather, a bonus color for the Honor 8X: Phantom Blue. Take a look at the photos below — it’s pretty.What makes the color “phantom” is the shifting quality of its finish, which changes from blue to purple and pink when it catches the light. It’s a technique that Huawei and other Chinese rivals have used on phones in 2018 to eye-catching effect. The Huawei P20 Pro was one particularly successful example, with a similar color gradient to the new Honor 8X shade. $174 Now playing: Watch this: Post a comment 2:58 CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show.Dazzling Honor View 20 has you in its thrall at CES 2019 14 Photos Mentioned Above Huawei Honor 8X (black) CES 2019 0 Huawei Honor 8Xcenter_img See it Preview • The Honor 8X is like a super-cheap iPhone XS Max, in all the best ways Dazzling Honor View 20 phone will dazzle you Phones Tags 28 Photos Huawei has sold 6 million Honor 8X phones, the company announced ahead of CES 2019.The Honor View 20, which we also saw here at CES, comes in Phantom Red and Phantom Blue, which are equally mesmerizing. See what I mean in the gallery below. Huawei Share your voice CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Colors may not seem like the last thing people should care about when buying a new phone, but bright hues and eccentric finishes are one surefire way for companies to grab buyers’ attention in a crowded marketplace. While Huawei is struggling to sell its phones in an increasingly hostile global environment that questions the company’s close relationship with the Chinese government, it nevertheless continues to push phones in friendly markets and innovate on features, software and design.last_img read more

Thailand market bomb kills 3

first_imgA Thai forensics unit scours the aftermath of a motorcycle bombing which killed three civilians and wounded others at a market in the restive southern Thai province of Yala on 22 January, 2018. Photo: AFPA motorcycle bomb killed three civilians and wounded 22 others on Monday morning at a market in Thailand’s insurgency-hit south, officials said, the first such attack on a ‘soft target’ in the Muslim-majority region for months.A rebellion against Thai rule in the culturally distinct Thai “Deep South” bordering Malaysia has left nearly 7,000 dead — the majority civilians — since 2004.The death toll in 2017 from the insurgency was the lowest in 13 years of conflict as peace talks edged forwards and the Thai junta boosted its security lockdown on the region.But Monday’s bomb at a packed market in Yala town popular with Buddhists and Muslims suggests a return to attacks on civilian targets.Chunks of torn corrugated roofing and parts of destroyed motorbikes and stalls littered a narrow alleyway in the market, as police picked through a scene of devastation shortly after the bomb.”The suspects parked the motorcycle in front of a stall selling pork in downtown Yala… it detonated 10 minutes later killing three civilians and wounding 19 others,” the policeman told AFP, requesting anonymity.”It’s the first big attack in downtown Yala in two years and is quite serious because people died.”It was not immediately clear if the bomb deliberately targeted the pork stall — and potentially its Buddhist customers.The wounded were taken to the main hospital in Yala, which is the main town of the province with the same name.Pramote Prom-in, an army spokesman for the region, confirmed the death toll, adding 22 were wounded “mainly with minor injuries”.Thailand, which colonised the ethnically Malay south roughly a century ago, has for decades been confronted by ethnic fighters seeking more autonomy, but the conflict flared up into its bloodiest phase in 2004.Rights groups have accused both the insurgents and security forces of widespread human rights abuses.The shadowy militant cells, who operate from remote communities and the forested Malaysia border zone have in recent months stepped back from targeting civilians amid heavy criticism.Monday’s attack could mark a dangerous new turn in the tactics.”If it was the work of the insurgents, then it’s a sign of things to come — a stern message to the authorities that they will resort to hitting soft targets,” Don Pathan, a Thailand-based independent analyst, told AFP.Pathan speculated the market blast could be “retaliation” for a specific incident in a conflict defined by tit-for-tat operations by insurgents and security forces.”But over recent years the insurgents haven’t targeted civilians out right… this is a big concern.”last_img read more

Novel Superlens Offers a Simplified Subwavelength Imaging Technique

first_img Cesar Monzon of Enig Associates, Inc., in Bethesda, Maryland, has presented this new technique in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters. As Monzon explains, many (but not all) subwavelength imaging mechanisms involve a complicated implementation and offer narrowband operation, such as lenses using metamaterials. He hopes that his technique could overcome these challenges with purely resistive means, simply by using a thin electrically conducting sheet to counteract the effects of space’s filtration properties. “An important advantage of the present method is that the resolution of the image so produced is not limited by the extent of a wavelength as in a common lens, but by the separation from the image to the conducting thin sheet,” Monzon told PhysOrg.com. “In fact, the analysis presented in the paper indicates that we can easily form images 10 times sharper than a conventional lens (or 5% of a wavelength of operation). Actually, depending on the frequency of operation, achieving images that are over 20 times higher resolution than possible with diffraction limited optics seems feasible. Hence the proposed technique is that of a ‘superlens,’ because it beats the diffraction limit.”Basically, space acts like a low pass filter for highly evanescent components, and makes evanescent waves very short-lived; these waves usually decay exponentially with the distance from their light source. Monzon found that, when he placed a thin sheet of conducting material close to the light source, the sheet could restore the evanescent components of the light that had been diminished by the air in between. “Saving” these evanescent wave components results in near-field subwavelength imaging right behind the resistive sheet. The “spot size” (imaging area) depends on the separation between the light source and the sheet, meaning that extremely high resolution is possible for very small separations. As an additional benefit, the effect is found to be broadband.”An evanescent wave is essentially a near field wave component that is not propagating away from a radiator, but remains standing in its neighborhood,” Monzon explained. “Evanescent fields are responsible for the reactive energy around a radiator, and generally decay quickly with distance. Just like radiating waves, evanescent waves are a general property of wave equations, and since they basically form the near field of a radiator, they are needed for its proper reconstruction (via focusing or imaging). Now suppose we have a point radiator; if evanescent waves are not used in the reconstruction, such as done by a typical lens (which operate in the far field), then we get a diffraction limited image where the minimum spot size is commensurate with the wavelength. If on the other hand we utilize the evanescent fields, as done here, then we are not bound by a diffraction limited spot size, as the evanescent field spectrum has the ability to form the very near field. For a point radiator this means, in principle, extreme resolution, with a minimum spot size clearly a very small fraction of the wavelength, hence enabling very high resolution imaging.” (PhysOrg.com) — Since the first demonstrations of subwavelength imaging just a few years ago, scientists have been making great improvements, developing a variety of new methods for realizing high-resolution imaging. Recently, a new superlens for subwavelength imaging has been developed that offers a simplified and wide broadband operation. The superlens could potentially shrink the size of features on computer chips to make faster transistors, as well as increase the storage capacity of computer memory. Unlike in previous subwavelength imaging techniques that use surface plasmons (electron density fluctuations) and that are plagued by losses, the new technique has a different physical cause based on harnessing the spectrum of evanescent fields. As Monzon explained, the smaller wave impedance of the conducting sheet enables researchers to trade definition for amplitude.”What is shown here is that a simple conducting thin sheet acts like a special type of ‘lens’ for evanescent fields, allowing the details of a nearby image to be transferred to the other side of the sheet faithfully (this happens because accurate reconstruction of the evanescent fields of the original image takes place there),” Monzon explained. “Now, it happens that the more conducting the sheet is, the more faithful the reconstruction. However, as we know, the more conducting the sheet is, the more reflective it becomes, resulting in smaller transmitted fields, and a lower amplitude image being formed. Thus better definition can be obtained at the expense of sacrificing amplitude, and vice versa.”This technique could have useful applications, showing that micrometer or nanometer layers of resistive materials can be used to achieve subwavelength imaging in the optical and elusive infrared regions. The method could also be applied to other areas of physics where wave motion exists.”The sharper images, the simplicity of the scheme, and the broadband operation are definite advantages for applications,” Monzon said. “A superlens such as this, capable of creating images of objects or features much smaller than the wavelength of light, could be use in novel types of microscopes, of the super-resolution type. The method can also be used to shrink the size of features on computer chips, so to make smaller transistors that will result in faster computer chips. There is also potential to use this technique in computer memory technology such as read and write devices, so as to be able to access even smaller bits, which can definitely increase general storage capacity/density, and the corresponding data transfer capability.”More information: Cesar Monzon. “Subwavelength Imaging Using Conducting Sheets.” Physical Review Letters, 102, 173901 (2009).© 2009 PhysOrg.com Citation: Novel Superlens Offers a Simplified Subwavelength Imaging Technique (2009, May 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-05-superlens-subwavelength-imaging-technique.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Goal of nanoscale optical imaging gets boost with new hyperlenslast_img read more

Promoting art for all

first_imgArt is nothing but expression. We as the most evolved creatures of this universe are in a continuous dialogue- at times with our own selves and often with those around. Impressions of what we think and what we perceive is what we communicate. This is what is the concept behind Arts Unlimited’s Great Masters of Europe in High Renaissance exhibition is all about. The exhibition started on 3 and will continue till 9 November at the capital’s Rabindra Bhavan. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Showcasing the works of ten upcoming artists, the exhibition is curated by Poonam Rana. It is also supporting the works of some artists from modest backgrounds. . A discerning jury will be awarding the best artist. The guests of honor include personalities from the world of fitness, fashion, art and NGOs while the participating artist are- Subrata Ganguly, Poonam Rana, Jamal Ahmed, R.YogeshwarArt is a means of a dialogue between man and man.  And what better can it be, when this dialogue serves a noble cause too. Arts Shows Unlimited believe in expanding the horizons and providing a worthy platform to display their artworks to some very promising artists, who have stayed away from display of their works, due to their modest financial backgrounds. The idea is make art accessible for everyone.Where: Lalit Kala Akedemy, Rabindra Bhawan When: On till  9 Novemberlast_img read more

Flair takes off from Vancouver Kelowna and Pearson

first_img<< Previous PostNext Post >> Flair takes off from Vancouver, Kelowna and Pearson Share Posted by Tags: Canada, Flair Airlines, New Routescenter_img Travelweek Group KELOWNA — Today marks the first day Flair Airlines will fly from Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Toronto Pearson Airport (YYZ), and Kelowna International airport (YLW), making it the first ULCC carrier in Canada to fly from the three gateways.The addition of YVR, YYZ and YLW to Flair’s route network was announced back in September. Service will include direct flights between Toronto to Edmonton, and Vancouver to Kelowna and Edmonton, with one-stop flights to Toronto (and returns).“Flair is making significant strides, operating as the only ULCC in Canada. Over the last six months we have expanded our route network, we have increased our aircraft fleet by purchasing two more Boeing 737-400s, we have entered into the Global Distribution System, making it easier for customers to purchase air tickets, and so we are now excited to bring our low fares to these new markets,” said Chris Lapointe, Vice President Commercial Operations, Flair Airlines.More news:  Sunwing offers ultimate package deal ahead of YXU flights to SNU, PUJFlair plans to operate 12 aircraft by the spring of 2019.Schedule highlights include:Toronto to: Edmonton (direct 7x weekly); Vancouver (one-stop 4x weekly); and Kelowna (one-stop 3x weekly).Vancouver to: Kelowna (direct 4x weekly); Edmonton (direct 4x weekly); and Toronto (one-stop 4x weekly).Kelowna to: Edmonton (direct 3x weekly); Toronto (one-stop 3x weekly); and Vancouver (4x weekly).Flair’s route network also includes Hamilton, Winnipeg, Edmonton and Abbotsford.Earlier this month Flair Airlines announced it was starting to distribute its content via Amadeus. Smajic said a Travelport connection is expected to be live by the end of January and talks are ongoing with Sabre.The airline is also “planning to grow and start international flights” towards the end of March 2018, said Smajic. Flair is adding two new aircraft to its fleet at the beginning of the next year. Friday, December 15, 2017 last_img read more