Tag Archiv: 上海龙凤网

ADCs Fall Conference to Address Redevelopment Issues at Active Closed Bases

first_imgADC will hold its first Installation Reuse Forum in October to discuss redevelopment issues affecting both active and closed installations.Much of the three-day event, scheduled for Oct. 17-19 in Atlanta, will focus on topics common to both active and closed bases — primarily, how to return excess property and infrastructure to productive use. Communities and developers tasked with converting closed bases to residential, commercial and other uses face a unique economic development challenge — how to rejuvenate property burdened with antiquated infrastructure and contamination.The challenge is similar for communities with active installations where services are struggling to manage the increasing volume of vacant facilities, leaving base commanders with the task of finding new uses for those properties or spending scarce resources to maintain them.Addressing these issues will require innovative ideas that can drive new partnerships among installations, communities and developers. The Forum will focus on the variety of tools the development community can rely on as it works with the military to eliminate excess property at active installations and closed bases.The Installation Reuse Forum replaces the Base Redevelopment Forum, which ADC held for the past three years. Look for details on the program, hotel and registration when the Installation Reuse Forum website is launched next week. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

BoycottAmazon trends on Twitter over door mats shower curtains featuring Hindu deities

first_imgMany Indians have also tweeted to External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj asking her to take action to put an end to these products. They are being sold on the Amazon US app.Many tweets have shown that along with Hindu religious images, Amazon has been selling shower curtains and mats of symbols from other religions like Islam, Christianity, Sikhism and Buddhism. Amazon USAmazon is in quite a bit of trouble after many Indians, especially Hindus, called them out for selling bath mats, toilet seat covers and shoes bearing the images of Hindu Gods and Goddesses. The Indian flag also featured on shoes and bath mats.A hashtag, #BoycottAmazon, started trending on Twitter with many users sharing videos and photos of them deleting the e-commerce app.  last_img

Guatemala volcano death toll up to 69

first_imgA youth cries over the coffin of Nery Otoniel Gomez Rivas, 17, whose body was pulled from the volcanic ash during the eruption of the Volcan de Fuego, which in Spanish means Volcano of Fire, during his wake at the main park of the town San Juan Alotenango, Guatemala on 4 June. Photo: APGuatemalan authorities have increased the confirmed death toll from the eruption of the Volcano of Fire to 69 as officials suspended the search until dawn on Tuesday.Fanuel Garcia is the director of Guatemala’s National Institute of Forensic Sciences and he announced the higher death toll late Monday. He said only 17 of the dead have been identified so far.The burning ash and mud that engulfed villages on the volcano’s flanks Sunday left many victims unrecognizable. They will have to be identified through DNA testing or other means.A lack of electricity in the most heavily hit zone makes safely searching at night impossible.Rescuers pulled survivors and bodies from the charred aftermath of the powerful eruption of Guatemala’s Volcano of Fire a disaster that caught residents of remote mountain hamlets off guard, with little or no time to flee to safety.Using shovels and backhoes, emergency workers dug through the debris and mud, perilous labour on smouldering terrain still hot enough to melt shoe soles a day after the volcano exploded in a hail of ash, smoke and molten rock.Bodies were so thickly coated with ash that they looked like statues, and rescuers were forced to use sledgehammers to break through the roofs of houses buried in debris up to their rooflines to try to see if anyone was trapped inside.In the afternoon, Fanuel Garcia, director of the National Institute of Forensic Sciences, said 62 bodies had been recovered and 13 of those had been identified. Guatemala’s national disaster agency later raised the toll to 69.“It is very difficult for us to identify them because some of the dead lost their features or their fingerprints” from the red-hot flows, Garcia said. “We are going to have to resort to other methods … and if possible take DNA samples to identify them.”Hilda Lopez said her mother and sister were still missing after the slurry of hot gas, ash and rock roared into her village of San Miguel Los Lotes, just below the mountain’s flanks.“We were at a party, celebrating the birth of a baby, when one of the neighbors shouted at us to come out and see the lava that was coming,” the distraught woman said. “We didn’t believe it, and when we went out the hot mud was already coming down the street.”“My mother was stuck there, she couldn’t get out,” said Lopez, weeping and holding her face in her hands.Her husband, Joel Gonzalez, said his father had also been unable to escape and was believed to be “buried back there, at the house.”Guatemalan authorities say they had been closely monitoring the Volcano of Fire, one of Central America’s most active, after activity picked up around 6 a.m. Sunday.The volcano has registered a number of minor eruptions over the years, and no evacuations were ordered as scientific experts reported the activity was decreasing.Guatemala’s disaster agency, Conred, issued a number of standard precautions, advising people to wear protective face masks, clean their rooftops of ash once the eruption was over and cover any food and water intended for human consumption. It also said to heed any recommendations from authorities. Guatemala City’s international airport was closed due to the danger to planes.Conred spokesman David de Leon said that around 2:00pm the volcano registered a new, more powerful explosion.Soon, searing flows of lava, ash and rock mixed with water and debris were gushing down the volcano’s flanks, blocking roads and burning homes.“It traveled much faster. It arrived in communities right when the evacuation alerts were being sent out,” de Leon said.Authorities scrambled to issue an evacuation order. Some communities emptied out safely. But in places like Los Lotes and the village of El Rodeo, about eight miles (12 kilometers) downslope from the crater, it was too late for many.The fast-moving flows overtook people in homes and streets with temperatures reaching as high as 1,300 degrees Fahrenheit (700 Celsius), and hot ash and volcanic gases that can cause rapid asphyxiation.Rafael Letran, a resident of El Rodeo, criticized Conred for not evacuating communities earlier.“When the lava was already here they passed by in their pickup trucks yelling at us to leave, but the cars did not stop to pick up the people,” Letran said. “The government is good at stealing, but when it comes to helping people they lack spark.”De Leon said the disaster agency followed protocol.“As soon as we received the information around 6:00am that the volcano was in an eruptive phase, the protocol was initiated to verify with different sectors and also talk to the communities, to community leaders. … We had the information from our scientific service, and they told us the trend was that the activity was diminishing,” he said.In El Rodeo on Monday, heavily armed soldiers wearing blue masks to avoid breathing in ash stood guard behind yellow tape cordoning off the disaster scene. Helmeted workers carried bodies away on stretchers, and smoke was still rising from some parts of the ashen landscape strewn with boulders and other debris.President Jimmy Morales traveled to survey the disaster area.Emergency crews in helicopters managed to pull at least 10 people alive from areas cut off by the flows. Conred said 3,271 people had been evacuated.last_img read more

Poet Al Mahmud passes away

first_imgPoet Al MahmudProminent poet Al Mahmud died at the age of 82 at a hospital in Dhaka on Friday night.The poet breathed his last at 11:05pm at the city’s Ibn Sina Hospital, confirmed his family.Abid Azam, a family friend and assistant of the poet, told Prothom Alo that Al Mahmud was put on life support as he was suffering from pneumonia and old-age complications.On 9 February, the poet was admitted to the hospital.Mir Abdus Shukur Al Mahmud, best known as Al Mahmud, was a poet, novelist, and short-story writer.He was born on 11 July, 1936 at Maurail in Brahmanbaria.Al Mahmud is considered as one of the greatest Bengla poets to have emerged in the 20th century.The Ekushey Padak winning poet’s works in Bangla poetry is dominated by his frequent use of imageries of rural Bangladesh.In the 1950s he was among those Bangalee poets who were outspoken in their writing on such subjects as the events of the Bangla Language Movement, nationalism, political and economic repression, and the struggle against the West Pakistani government.He spent his childhood in Maurail village.Mahmud started his career as a journalist and obtained widespread recognition after ‘Lok Lokantor’ was published in 1963.Al Mahmud was honoured with Ekushey Padak, Bangla Academy Award, and Kabi Jasim Uddin Award in recognition of his contribution to Bangla literature.last_img read more

California Wildfires Leave Seasonal Agricultural Workers In Limbo

first_imgFarida Jhabvala Romero/KQEDLuis Guerrero fills barrels with crushed grapes at Valley of the Moon winery in Sonoma, Calif., Oct 16, 2017. Guerrero says he’s struggling to pay for rent after the wildfires forced the winery to close.For more than a week, Marisol Paniagua has been living at an evacuation center. She had been scheduled to pick grapes at a vineyard near the city of Santa Rosa, Calif. But that work was canceled because of the wildfires ravaging Northern California.“It’s very difficult right now because we just have a little bit of gas left in our car. That’s how we are still able to drive around,” said Paniagua, 37. “But the fact is, we have nothing.”The wildfires in Northern California have already done more than $1 billion in damage according to the state’s insurance commissioner. In Sonoma County, one of the hardest hit areas, about a third of the economy is related to agriculture, wine and tourism.Now, seasonal workers in the region like Paniagua are facing the loss of jobs and income.Paniagua, who’s originally from Mexico, has lived in the Santa Rosa area for more than 20 years. All three of her children were born in the U.S. But now she wonders whether she’ll be able to afford to stay in the area.“Without money and without work, what are we going to do here?” says Paniagua.In California, Latinos make up 71 percent of agricultural workers. The fires ravaging wine country are hitting this population hard. The lack of jobs and the destruction of affordable homes due to the fires could force people to move elsewhere. That’s a concern for grape growers in the region.“We cannot afford to lose our labor force. Nobody can whether it’d be in agriculture or anything else,” says Chad Clark with Allied Grape Growers, a California wine-grape marketing cooperative that represents more than 100 wineries in areas affected by wildfires.He says dozens of vineyard owners have sustained damage. He says that could displace seasonal agricultural workers. Still most vineyards are standing, and Clark says the priority there is to pick the grapes left on the vines as quickly as possible.“That’s proving to be very difficult, just because of all the road closures,” Clark says. “And you know, what people have lost — they’ve lost their vehicles, their means of transportation.”Valley of the Moon is one of the oldest wineries in the region. It wasn’t damaged, but many of its workers had to evacuate their homes. General Manager Dave MacDonald says grape growers are concerned about their workers and will try to help them.The winery subcontracts crews of farmworkers, plus has about 25 workers in other areas. MacDonald said only 10 workers were around the day I was there — and only for half a day.“I know that you know every company in this industry will do their best to help to absorb some of that workforce and help to find some work for others that need it,” says MacDonald.Valley of the Moon was closed last week, and it is only slowly beginning to return to normal operations. Some grape growers have said they’ll pay their seasonal agricultural workers anyway.Luis Guerrero has 25 years of experience in wineries. He is working near Valley of the Moon’s cellar, using a big metal hose to fill wooden barrels with crushed grapes.“I really needed to start working again,” says Guerrero, who makes $16 per hour working in wine production. “The work that I lost last week, that was money that would have paid for my rent.”Typically, seasonal hires in the area don’t get paid if they don’t work.“While the fires continue, there’s a lot of uncertainty,” said Guerrero. “Yesterday we came to work and they told us, ‘No,’ so we turned back.”Karissa Kruse, president of the Sonoma County Winegrowers, says some vineyard owners have said they will pay workers anyway for last week because the fires were an event completely out of the ordinary.Farida Jhabvala Romero is a reporter with member station KQED in San Francisco.Copyright 2017 KQED. To see more, visit KQED. Sharelast_img read more

Houston Public Media elevates stories that matter the most to the Lone

first_img Share FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEContact:Victoria CordovaHouston Public Media832.842.5866vcordova@houstonpublicmedia.orgVicky CharlestonHouston Public Media713.743.5380vcharleston@houstonpublicmedia.orgView Printable VersionHouston Public Media elevates the stories that matter the most to the Lone Star through regional and national newsroom collaborations.Houston is one of four participating cities in American Public Media’s Marketplace Hub. The new pilot project is a partnership between Marketplace and select public media stations across the country to generate more content from different geographic regions.Houston Public Media’s Energy and Environment Reporter Travis Bubenik will be contributing two national stories a month to Marketplace as part of this collaboration effort, sharing the latest on the tangled intersections of energy and the environment in Houston and across Texas with a national audience. Marketplace is the most widely heard business and economic programming in the nation, broadcasting on more than 800 public radio stations nationwide and heard by 14.6 million listeners every week.For the latest stories and shows on Marketplace from Travis Bubenik, check out https://www.marketplace.org/people/travis-bubenik.# # #About Houston Public Media Houston Public Media is a service of the University of Houston and supported with financial gifts from the community. Houston Public Media combines broadcast and digital assets to serve residents of Southeast Texas with trusted local news and entertainment and national programming from NPR and PBS. With a combined weekly audience of more than 1.5 million, Houston Public Media is committed to delivering content that expands minds and possibilities with trusted information.last_img read more

Postage Stamp Honoring Bush 41 Will Be Released In College Station

first_imgAPIn this Feb. 5, 2017, file photo, former President George H.W. Bush arrives on the field before the NFL Super Bowl 51 football game between the Atlanta Falcons and the New England Patriots in Houston.The U.S. Postal Service is issuing a Forever stamp honoring President George H.W. Bush, who passed away in Houston on November 30, 2018, at the age of 94.On June 12, USPS will hold an event to officially issue the stamp at the Bush School of Government & Public Service in College Station. The former president is buried nearby at the Bush Presidential Library and Museum, next to his wife, Barbara, and their daughter, Robin.Pierce Bush, one of Bush’s grandchildren, is scheduled to attend the event, along with Robert Duncan, chairman of the USPS Board of Governors; David Jones, president and CEO of the George & Barbara Bush Foundation; and Jean Becker, former chief of staff to the President.Dear Fellow Americans, We’re honoring the 41st President who devoted his life to public service. Add a presidential stamp to your mail with the #GHWBushStamp available for pre-order at https://t.co/pj71iOzXN9. pic.twitter.com/AHoewWu6Xb— U.S. Postal Service (@USPS) May 20, 2019Bush served as President from 1989 to 1993. The continuing normalization of relations with the former Soviet Union after the cold war, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the First Gulf War in 1990 were some of the key milestones of his presidency.After his death, he was remembered for his service during World War II, as well as his statesmanship and lifetime of public service.The Bush family became an icon of Houston. They lived in the Bayou City before residing in Washington, D.C. and after the presidency, the former president and first lady gave Houston worldwide exposure. They frequented philanthropic and sports events and local restaurants, establishing a memorable bond with many Houstonians.The funerals for Barbara and George Bush were both held in Houston last year, with thousands of people attending to pay their last respects.  Sharelast_img read more

Community Choir in Spring Concert at Good Shepherd Baptist Church

first_imgMany have been waiting for the spring concert of the Community Concert Choir of Baltimore, which will be held at 5 p.m., May 25 at Good Shepherd Baptist Church, 3459 Park Heights Avenue. The group of more than 100 singers will render a program, entitled “Let Me Walk with Thee,” that will feature classically trained musicians, including organist W. Patrick Alston and accompanist Marcus D. Smith, who are Baltimore City Public School music educators at City College High School. “We are committed to preserve the rich music of the Black Church, which is celebrated around the world,” said Marco K. Merrick, the choir’s founding director. “In many churches, you no longer hear these songs, nor is our heritage taught and shared — people hunger for it.” Founded in 2010, the CCC has quickly become a noted musical force in the Baltimore Washington Metropolitan area, garnering standing-room only crowds at its signature concerts each spring and fall. The annual fall concert benefits programs for students in Baltimore City Public Schools and is sponsored by Alpha Phi Alpha, Fraternity, Delta Lambda Chapter. This concert is free and open to the public. A freewill offering will be received during the concert and a reception will be held for everyone in the church’s fellowship hall. For further information, contact Good Shepherd Baptist Church at 410-462-5864 or Dr. Marco K. Merrick at 410-728-4129 or marcomerrick@aol.comlast_img read more

Plex Introduces New Desktop App Ends Home Theater PC Support

first_imgMedia center app maker Plex introduced a new app for Windows and Mac OS Thursday that comes with some significant changes to its support for desktop PCs. Most notably, Plex is phasing out support for Home Theater PC (HTPC) setups.Plex’s new desptop app also replaces the company’s dedicated Windows Store app, and introduces a new framework for downloading media for offline consumption that will ultimately find its way to its mobile apps as well. Finally, the app also comes with the company’s newly-refreshed user interface, which introduces a navigation sidebar.However, the decision to end support for HTPCs  is likely going to be the most controversial among Plex’s user base. “It marks the end of an era for us, and we’d be lying if we said it wasn’t a little bittersweet,” the Plex team wrote in a blog post. However, media consumption has changed a lot since those early days. “We looked at how most people were using the app, and most of you will have an equal (if not better) experience with a streaming device and our new players,” the Plex team wrote Thursday.They went on to argue that streaming devices use a fraction of the electricity, and are a lot easier to use. “We implore you to check out how far our apps and the various excellent streaming devices have come — it’s truly night-and-day since you unboxed your first potato-powered Roku or Apple TV,” the company said.Plex will continue to support and update its existing HTPC solution, the Plex Media Player, until January 2020, according to the blog post. Time will tell whether some of its early users will at that point make the jump to competing solutions, or whether they will embrace the company’s apps on smart TVs and streaming devices.Popular on Variety: Oculus Quest Will Have Netflix, but Not Plex or HBO For the uninitiated, HTPCs are dedicated PCs connected to TVs or projectors to access streaming services and downloadable media. This used to be the primary way for early adopters to bring digital media to their TV screens, and apps like Plex owe much of their early popularity to this use case. In fact, Plex, XMBC / Kodi and Boxee all gained significant traction after Microsoft stopped investing resources into its own HTPC solution, dubbed Windows Media Center. Relatedcenter_img Inside Plex’s Quest to Become a One-Stop Shop for Digital Media ×Is Disney’s Domination Good for the Box Office?Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpKeke Palmer Opens Up About Joining ‘Good Morning America’ as Third Host01:05 twitter facebook reddit Linkhttps://variety.com/2019/digital/news/plex-desktop-app-htpc-1203303541/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0004:1504:15More Videos01:05Keke Palmer Opens Up About Joining ‘Good Morning America’ as Third Host04:35Jennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul06:18Best Fashion of the 2019 VMAs: Taylor Swift, Lizzo and Lil Nas X Stand Out00:55Leslie Jones Tried to Get Free App Credits for Being in ‘The Angry Birds Movie 2’01:04Keke Palmer Was Inspired by Her ‘Hustlers’ Co-Stars05:20’It: Chapter 2′ Review: Is ‘It’ a Hit?Closelast_img read more

Scientists record yoctonewton forces

first_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com The researchers, from the University of Sydney, in NSW Australia, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Colorado, USA, have used their system to measure forces three orders of magnitude smaller than any previously measured force. The forces were as small as 174 yoctonewtons, or 174 septillionths of a newton (174 x 10-24 newtons).Professor Michael Biercuk of the University of Sydney and colleagues developed their system using a Penning trap, a device in which ions are confined in two dimensions by a strong magnetic field, and in the third dimension by a weak electrostatic field. About 60 beryllium ions are held in the trap and kept very cold to eliminate motion due to thermal effects. The ions are charged and normally line up in the center of the trap. They are affected by any stray electrical or magnetic fields, which cause them to vibrate and become displaced from the center.Any movement produced by an applied force is detected by reflecting a laser off the ions and measuring any Doppler shift in the frequency of the light. (The light’s frequency is slightly higher when the ion is moving towards the detector, and lower when moving away.) The detection system was able to measure the strength forces in the yoctonewtons range.Until the present experiment, the smallest forces ever measured were in the attonewton range (10-18 newtons). These measurements were made coupling micro- or nano-fabricated resonators to systems such as single-electron transistors, or superconducting microwave cavities. The ability to detect tiny forces is important for applications such as tests of fundamental physical phenomena and precision spin-resonance imaging.The researchers hope to eventually be able to measure a single yoctonewton by using a single beryllium ion in the trap, and they believe their experiments will lead to the development of a new class of sensors based on trapped ions. Their results are published online in the pre-publication blog ArXiv. Scientists develop novel ion trap for sensing force and light Explore further Citation: Scientists record yoctonewton forces (2010, April 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-04-scientists-yoctonewton.htmlcenter_img (PhysOrg.com) — Scientists in Australia and the US have discovered that trapped ions are “exquisitely sensitive” force detectors, and have used them to record the tiniest forces ever measured. Phase-coherent Doppler velocimetry. (a) Atomic resonance employed for detection of ionmotion, 19 MHz. (b) Schematic of the Doppler-detection system based on photon-arrival-time measurements. (c) Schematic of pulse sequencing/triggering for phase-coherent detection. (d) Histogram of photon arrival times relative to start-pulses generated synchronously with an RF excitation of the COM mode on resonance. Photon arrivals are bunched with periodicity given by the driven COM oscillation period, and su er hardware delays. Solid blue line is an exponential t to the data used to remove a background scattering rate. Figure credit: Michael J. Biercuk et al., ArXiv, http://arxiv.org/abs/1004.0780 (see paper for details) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Judge In Opioid Trial Rules Johnson John

first_imgJudge In Opioid Trial Rules Johnson & Johnson Must Pay… Sue Ogrocki https://ondemand.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/atc/2019/08/20190826_atc_oklahoma_opio…center_img by NPR News Jackie Fortier, Brian Mann 8.26.19 6:31pm Updated at 6:00 p.m. ETAn Oklahoma judge has ruled that drugmaker Johnson & Johnson helped ignite the state’s opioid crisis by deceptively marketing painkillers, and must pay $572 million to the state.Oklahoma sought $17.5 billion, blaming Johnson & Johnson for fueling the crisis that has claimed the lives of more than 6,000 people in the state.It’s the first ruling to hold a pharmaceutical company responsible for one of the worst drug epidemics in American history.Judge Thad Balkman delivered his decision from the bench, after presiding over a seven-week civil trial in the college town of Norman, Okla.”The defendants caused an opioid crisis that is evidenced by increased rates of addiction, overdose deaths and neonatal abstinence syndrome in Oklahoma,” Judge Balkman said in a statement.Johnson & Johnson immediately released a statement saying that the company “plans to appeal the opioid judgment in Oklahoma.”Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter’s suit alleged that Johnson & Johnson, through its pharmaceutical subsidiary Janssen, helped ignite a public health crisis that has killed thousands of state residents.Balkman said in the ruling that the state made its case that Johnson & Johnson contributed to the state’s opioid crisis, affirming the key legal argument of the state’s case, that the drugmaker had created a “public nuisance.””The state met its burden,” Balkman said, proving the company acted improperly with its “misleading marketing and promotion of opioids.””This is a temporary public nuisance that can be abated and the proper remedy for the public nuisance is equitable abatement,” he said in a statement.Johnson & Johnson argues that the facts don’t support the judge’s finding.”This judgment is a misapplication of public nuisance law that has already been rejected by judges in other states,” said Michael Ullmann, executive vice president, general counsel for Johnson & Johnson, in a statement. “The unprecedented award for the state’s ‘abatement plan’ has sweeping ramifications for many industries and bears no relation to the company’s medicines or conduct.”Attorney General Hunter celebrated the state’s win, despite the discrepancy between the $572 million award and the billions the state had asked for.”It’s going to be an important step forward in dealing with the epidemic,” he told reporters. “Certainly we would have liked to walk out of here with $17 billion, but realistically we’ve been able to get together almost a billion dollars to help Oklahoma.”Initially, Hunter’s lawsuit included Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin. In March, Purdue Pharma settled with the state for $270 million. Soon after, Hunter dropped all but one of the civil claims, including fraud, against the two remaining defendants.Just two days before the trial began, another defendant, Teva Pharmaceuticals of Jerusalem, announced an $85 million settlement with the state.Both companies deny any wrongdoing.Johnson & Johnson marketed the opioid painkillers Duragesic and Nucynta. Lawyers for the company say its products were highly regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, among other agencies, and that the state did not provide any evidence showing the company’s sales practices helped fuel the crisis. It argued these branded opioid products made up less than 1% of total opioid prescriptions in Oklahoma.As NPR reported in July, during the trial the state’s expert witness, Dr. Andrew Kolodny, testified that Johnson & Johnson also profited by manufacturing raw ingredients for opioids and then selling them to other companies, including Purdue, which makes Oxycontin.Speaking on behalf of Janssen and Johnson & Johnson Monday, attorney Sabrina Strong told reporters that “litigation is not the answer” to the opioid crisis.”Johnson & Johnson did not cause the opioid crisis. Although it includes some diversion of prescription medicine, it’s largely driven by illegally manufactured drugs that are coming into the country from Mexico and elsewhere,” she said.The case is being closely watched by plaintiffs in other opioid lawsuits, particularly the roughly 2,000 cases in the National Prescription Opiate Litigation which is pending before a federal judge in Ohio. That consolidated lawsuit includes 22 defendants — opioid manufacturers and distributors, including Johnson & Johnson.In a statement, the co-lead plaintiff attorneys of the Ohio litigation called today’s ruling a “milestone,” saying the ruling in favor of Oklahoma’s public nuisance claims is a “critical step forward” for the communities they represent.”The ruling in favor of the State of Oklahoma’s public nuisance claims confirms what communities have been saying for some time: the opioid epidemic significantly interfered with public health,” said the attorneys, Paul T. Farrell Jr., Paul J. Hanly, Jr., and Joseph F. Rice.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.last_img read more