Tag Archiv: 上海浦东新区扫黄2019

Man United pays price for timidity in limp Champions League exit

first_img“It’s not the end of the world,” he said.No regrets. No genuine sadness. Indeed, Mourinho chose the occasion of one of United’s most miserable nights in years to highlight his own past successes.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk“I sat in this chair twice in the Champions League,” Mourinho said. “I knock out Manchester United at home at Old Trafford. I sit in this chair with Porto (in 2004), Man United out. I sit in this chair with Real Madrid (in 2013), Man United out. I don’t think it’s something new for the club.”Hardly the words United fans would want to hear. Not after those two timid displays in the last 16 against Sevilla. 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Brown among SAG Awards presenters Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil MOST READ In Liverpool, Man United sees the pain and path to recoverycenter_img Playing with caution in the away leg three weeks ago was understandable, despite the general acceptance that a 0-0 draw away from home is not so great a result these days. To be honest, it was never really going to be any other way under Mourinho.But at home? With United’s traditions? With the attacking riches at Mourinho’s disposal? That was never going to wash with United’s supporters.It felt there was anxiety in the air from the start of the 2-1 loss at Old Trafford on Tuesday, which began — somewhat fittingly — with a long ball lumped up toward Marouane Fellaini. By the midway point of the second half, Sevilla had grown into the game — Ever Banega and Steven Nzonzi controlling the midfield — and United’s players knew they were in a precarious situation.Then substitute Wissam Ben Yedder came on, gave Sevilla the cutting edge it was missing, and scored twice in four minutes. United needed a complete change in mentality, and had 12 minutes to score three goals. It was never going to happen.“I don’t have regrets,” Mourinho said.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Manchester United head coach Jose Mourinho walks to the dressing room after his side were defeated by Sevilla during the Champions League round of 16 second leg soccer match at Old Trafford in Manchester, England, Tuesday, March 13, 2018. Sevilla won the game 2-1 and go through to the quarterfinals .(AP Photo/Dave Thompson)MANCHESTER, England — It was almost like Jose Mourinho didn’t care.Manchester United had just exited the Champions League in the meekest fashion and the team’s manager dealt with it with a shrug of the shoulders.ADVERTISEMENT Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina How about giving Fellaini a first start in any competition since Nov. 22, in United’s biggest game of the season? How about sending the team out with a cautious mindset? How about the latest disappointing display by new signing Alexis Sanchez?“I did my best, the players did their best. We tried, we lost,” Mourinho said. “That’s football.”The stark facts are that United had four shots on target across both legs, against a team that conceded more goals (12) than any other side still in the Champions League and five goals on two occasions in its past seven Spanish league games.Sevilla’s 21 shots in the second leg was the most United had given up at home in a competitive match since 2013 — in that loss to Mourinho’s Real Madrid.Nemanja Matic did what Mourinho couldn’t do and accepted that United was eliminated by the better team over the two legs.“There is no excuse,” the Serbia midfielder said. “Sevilla were better than us, so they deserved it.”All the momentum built up from huge wins over Chelsea and Liverpool in the Premier League over the past two weeks has been lost. United fans will just about accept their team having 32 percent possession at home against Liverpool, as long as it results in a victory — like it did on Saturday in what was widely regarded as a “Mourinho masterclass.”But when the team plays so conservatively and doesn’t win, questions will be asked of Mourinho’s methods that have always seemed at odds with United’s heritage of entertaining soccer.The fact that, across Manchester, rival Man City is playing some of the best soccer ever seen in the English game just puts United’s style of play further under scrutiny. LATEST STORIES Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anewlast_img read more

Mourinho brings up Conte match-fixing allegations

first_img0Shares0000Manchester United’s manager Jose Mourinho allowed fringe players to leave the club to pursue regular first-team football elsewhereLONDON, United Kingdom, Jan 6 – Jose Mourinho’s war of words with Antonio Conte has escalated further after the Manchester United boss brought up the Chelsea manager’s connection to a match-fixing scandal.The dispute began on Thursday when Mourinho said he did not need to behave like “a clown” on the touchline – an apparent reference to Conte’s antics during games. Conte responded on Friday afternoon by questioning whether Mourinho was suffering from senile dementia.But the spat went one step further after Man United’s FA Cup win over Derby, when Mourinho brought up an incident of attempted match-fixing during Conte’s spell in charge of Italian side Siena in 2011.Conte served a four-match ban in 2012, before he was acquitted of any wrongdoing in 2016, prior to taking charge at Chelsea.“The only thing I want to say to end the story is yes, I made mistakes in the past on the touchline. Yes, I will make less but I think I will still make a few,” said Mourinho.“What never happened to me and will never happen to me is to be suspended for match-fixing, that never happened to me and will never happen.”When asked about Conte’s remarks, Mourinho had initially absolved the Italian of any blame and pointed the finger at the media for escalating the fall-out.He said: “I don’t blame him. Honestly. I don’t blame him, I think the press should apologise to me and him.“Because the question that comes to him is completely wrong and because of that he had that out-of-control reaction. But I don’t blame him at all.“I was asked about my passion and you know I was speaking about myself and then the question to the Chelsea manager was that I said he behaved like a clown. Probably the journalist wanted to say that but didn’t have the courage so he said, ‘Mourinho said you behaved like a clown’.“I don’t blame the Chelsea manager at all and I understand his reaction. I was speaking about myself saying I don’t need to behave like a clown to show passion.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Boys from the hood: French team ignites dreams in gritty suburbs

first_img0Shares0000Young fans from Bondy took pictures with France star Kylian Mbappe after a training session in Russia © AFP/File / FRANCK FIFEBONDY, France, Jul 10 – In a housing estate in the gritty northern Paris suburb of Bondy, Adama Wagui showed off the stack of trophies he has accumulated during his budding football career.“Best goalkeeper AS Bondy 2016, best goalkeeper Vichy U17 tournament,” the tall 16-year-old with the shaved zig-zag footballer haircut said, reading aloud out the inscriptions on the cups that his parents keep on their bedside table. Wagui’s finest hour, however, may have been when he was called on to block shots from local wunderkind, star France striker Kylian Mbappe.“It was difficult,” he says with a shy smile, “but sometimes I succeeded.”As excitement builds at the prospect of Les Bleus taking home the World Cup, 20 years after their win on home soil, their success is a source of pride in the deprived estates or “banlieues” where many of France’s players honed their game.Of the 23 players in the French squad, around two-thirds are of Arab or African descent, drawing comparisons with the mythologised “Black-Blanc-Beur” (Black-White-Arab) team of 1998.Their legend looms large over the tower blocks that dominate the skyline of northeast Paris.“Nowadays young people are proud to say they come from Bondy,” Adama’s Senegalese-born father of seven Issa said.– ‘They live for football’ –Young members of the Bondy football club have been watching France, and Kylian Mbappe, play in the World Cup © AFP/File / Philippe LOPEZStanding on the pitch at AS Bondy’s home ground, coach Antonio Riccardi recalls the almost freakish talent of a young Mbappe, slaloming Maradona-style past five defenders to ram a ball into the back of the net.“The best players come out of these neighbourhoods because the kids here are always out kicking a ball,” Riccardi told AFP. “They live for football, whether at school or on the estate.”Like Paris Saint-Germain’s Mbappe, whose parents have Cameroonian and Algerian roots, many were born into immigrant families.But few make it out of the “banlieues”, trapped in a cycle of poverty, discrimination and underachievement that President Emmanuel Macron has compared to being “under house arrest” and former prime minister Manuel Valls criticised in 2015 as “apartheid”.“The only way out to make it here is in sport or rap,” said Ismail Gencel, the owner of a restaurant in Bondy.While Mbappe, born five months after France’s 1998 victory, dreams of joining the pantheon of World Cup winners, Adama dreams about following in his footsteps, out of Bondy into the big league.The task of managing his expectations falls to his coaches.“We tell them there is only one Messi, only one Ronaldo, only one Mbappe, and that the road to success cuts through school,” said Jeremy Mimouni, another coach at AS Bondy.– Love-hate relationship –The French World Cup winning team in 1998 were of mixed heritage, much like the 2018 squad © AFP/File / PASCAL GEORGEBecause there is only one Mbappe, his 50,000-strong hometown, which extends on either side of a motorway linking Paris to Charles de Gaulle airport, is intent on capitalising on his renown.“Bondy, the town where anything is possible,” read a giant poster of the player that was pasted across a block of flats overlooking the motorway after he was signed by PSG last year.Football aside it does not always feel that way, however.Unemployment in the region where Bondy is situated is running at 11.8 percent, compared to 7.1 percent in Paris.Weeds push up through the pavement outside the block of flats where the Wagui family lives and all the kids chasing a football around a nearby basketball court are black, highlighting the sense of segregation between central Paris and its suburbs.– ‘Enchanted interlude’ –Kylian Mbappe has been one of the stars of the 2018 World Cup © AFP/File / ANTONIN THUILLIERBut if football does hold up a mirror to French society, the relationship between the public and the national team has not always been a happy one.Players from the suburbs were being blamed for a mutiny at the 2010 tournament in South Africa, which ended with France crashing out in the first round.The slurs against some of the heroes of the “banlieues”, such as striker Nicolas Anelka, left scars in places like Bondy.Another World Cup win for a multi-ethnic team, coming as polls show French attitudes towards migrants hardening, “would create some positive momentum and unite people for a while,” Riccardi said.“But would it last?” he wondered.History suggests not.Four years after France’s 1998 win the myth of a united “Black-Blanc-Beur” country exploded when far-right National Front leader Jean-Marie Le Pen grabbed the runner-up spot behind Jacques Chirac in presidential elections.The win, historian Yvan Gastaut concluded in a 2007 article about immigration and football, had led to nothing more than an “enchanted interlude”.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more