Goldman Sachs just named the smallest, most diverse class of partners since its IPO

first_imgGoldman Sachs just named its smallest and most diverse class of partners since its 1999 initial public offering.The firm on Thursday named 60 employees to the coveted rank of partner, the highest title at the New York-based bank and a nod to its history as a private partnership.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Goldman is alone among big banks in naming partners. The title comes with perks: Partners earn a $950,000 base salary and gain access to lucrative internal investment funds.Here are the Goldman employees who become partners on January 1, 2021:Zachary Ablon, Global Markets, New York- Advertisement – Anne-Victoire Auriault, Global Markets, New YorkJose Barreto, Investment Banking, LondonJohn Brennan, Investment Banking, LondonRichard Chambers, Global Markets, New YorkTravis Chmelka, Global Markets, New YorkWilliam Connolly, Investment Banking, San FranciscoYasmine Coupal, Investment Banking, San FranciscoAdam Crook, Global Markets, LondonSimon Dangoor, Asset Management, LondonRajashree Datta, Risk, New YorkDarren Dixon, Global Markets, New YorkLisa Donnelly, Operations, LondonDavid Dubner, Investment Banking, New YorkJane Dunlevie, Investment Banking, San FranciscoOrla Dunne, Engineering, LondonIlya Gaysinskiy, Engineering, Jersey CityWendy Gorman, Risk, New YorkJett Greenberg, Global Markets, New YorkPhillip Han, Global Markets, New YorkMichael Hui, Asset Management, Hong KongRajiv Kamilla, Global Markets, New YorkDavid Kamo, Investment Banking, New YorkNimesh Khiroya, Investment Banking, LondonJerry Lee, Investment Banking, New YorkChristina Ma, Global Markets, Hong KongHillel Moerman, Asset Management, New YorkAimee Mungovan, Investment Banking, New YorkKaushik Murali, Global Markets, New YorkSara Naison-Tarajano, Consumer & Wealth Management, New YorkMike Nickols, Investment Banking, New YorkRyan Nolan, Investment Banking, San FranciscoBartosz Ostenda, Investment Banking, San FranciscoDavid Plutzer, Legal, New YorkNick Pomponi, Investment Banking, New YorkNicole Pullen Ross, Consumer & Wealth Management, New YorkMuhammad Qubbaj, Global Markets, New YorkMax Ramirez, Asset Management, LondonNeema Raphael, Engineering, New YorkRiccardo Riboldi, Global Markets, LondonOsmin Rivera, Global Markets, New YorkBrian Robinson, Global Markets, New YorkCosmo Roe, Investment Banking, New YorkJennifer Roth, Global Markets, New YorkJonathan Rousse, Global Markets, New YorkYassaman Salas, Investment Banking, New YorkGunjan Samtani, Engineering, BengaluruMichael Schlee, Compliance, New YorkLeonard Seevers, Asset Management, New YorkAles Sladic, Global Markets, Hong KongMiruna Stratan, Investment Banking, New YorkMichael Ungari, Asset Management, New YorkNicholas van den Arend, Investment Banking, LondonAlex von Moll, Global Markets, LondonHeather von Zuben, Asset Management, New YorkMonali Vora, Asset Management, New YorkMichael Voris, Investment Banking, New YorkDavid Wade, Global Markets, LondonKarl Wianecki, Asset Management, Jersey CityMark Wilson, Global Markets, London Since taking over in 2018, CEO David Solomon has pushed to make the partnership a more exclusive club, elevating fewer employees and hastening the departure of some partners. The bank named 69 partners in 2018 and 84 in 2016; it has a total of between 400 and 450 partners.While nearly half, or 47%, of this year’s group was categorized as diverse, a high water mark for the firm, most of those named partner are men. The bank said that 27% of new partners are women, 7% are Black, 5% are Latinx and 17% Asian.The incoming class and the overall partnership are also far less diverse than the targets the bank has set for its junior employees, where half of all new analysts and entry-level associates hired in the U.S. are supposed to be women, 11% black, and 14% Latinx.- Advertisement –last_img

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